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The Impact of Monetary Policy on the Exchange Rate: puzzling evidence from three emerging economies

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  • Emanuel Kohlscheen

Abstract

This study investigates the impact effect of monetary policy shocks on the exchange rates of Brazil, Mexico and Chile. We find that even a focus on 1 day exchange rate changes following policy events – which reduces the potential for reverse causality considerably – fails to lend support for the conventional view that associates interest rate hikes with appreciations. This lack of empirical backing for the predictions of standard open economy models that, for instance, combine the UIP condition with rational expectations (as in Dornbusch (1976)) persists irrespective of whether we use the US Dollar or effective exchange rates, whether interest rate changes are anticipated or not, whether changes in the policy rate that were followed by exchange rate intervention are excluded or whether "contaminated" events are dropped from the analysis. We argue that it is difficult to attribute this stronger version of the exchange rate puzzle to fiscal dominance, as similar results are obtained in the case of Chile - a country that has had the highest possible short-term credit rating since 1997 and a debt/GDP ratio below 10%. Indeed, in Chile a 100 b.p. hike leads to a 2.2 to 2.6% devaluation of the Peso on impact.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department in its series Working Papers Series with number 259.

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Date of creation: Nov 2011
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Handle: RePEc:bcb:wpaper:259

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Web page: http://www.bcb.gov.br/?english

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  1. Jonathan Kearns & Phil Manners, 2005. "The Impact of Monetary Policy on the Exchange Rate: A Study Using Intraday Data," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2005-02, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  2. Emanuel Kohlscheen, 2010. "Emerging Floaters: pass-throughs and (some) new commodity currencies," Working Papers Series 224, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
  3. Banerjee, Abhijit & Bacchetta, Philippe & Aghion, Philippe, 2001. "Currency Crises and Monetary Policy in an Economy with Credit Constraints," Scholarly Articles 4554218, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Carlos Eduardo Gonçalves & Bernardo Guimaraes Guimaraes, 2011. "Monetary policy, default risk and the exchange rate in Brazil," Revista Brasileira de Economia, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil), vol. 65(1), pages 33-45, March.
  5. Kraay, Aart, 2000. "Do high interest rates defend currencies during speculative attacks ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2267, The World Bank.
  6. Maurice J. Roche & Michael J. Moore, 2007. "Solving Exchange Rate Puzzles with neither Sticky Prices nor Trade Costs," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n1750507, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
  7. Goncalves, Carlos Eduardo S. & Salles, Joao M., 2008. "Inflation targeting in emerging economies: What do the data say?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1-2), pages 312-318, February.
  8. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-76, December.
  9. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Stefan Nagel & Lasse H. Pedersen, 2008. "Carry Trades and Currency Crashes," NBER Working Papers 14473, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Adrien Verdelhan, 2006. "A Habit-Based Explanation of the Exchange Rate Risk Premium," 2006 Meeting Papers 872, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  11. Philippe AGHION & Philippe BACCHETTA & Abhijit BANERJEE, 1999. "A Simple Model of Monetary Policy and Currency Crises," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 9914, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  12. Faust, Jon & Rogers, John H. & Wang, Shing-Yi B. & Wright, Jonathan H., 2007. "The high-frequency response of exchange rates and interest rates to macroeconomic announcements," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 1051-1068, May.
  13. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2004. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 1-48, February.
  14. Philippe Bacchetta & Eric van Wincoop, 2010. "Infrequent Portfolio Decisions: A Solution to the Forward Discount Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 870-904, June.
  15. Jun Pan & Kenneth J. Singleton, 2008. "Default and Recovery Implicit in the Term Structure of Sovereign "CDS" Spreads," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(5), pages 2345-2384, October.
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