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Agricultural Trade Liberalization: Assessing the Consequences for Developing Countries

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  • Bureau, Jean-Christophe
  • Jean, Sebastien
  • Matthews, Alan

Abstract

Recent analyses suggest that the impact of agricultural trade liberalization on developing countries will be very uneven. Simulations suggest that the effects of agricultural trade liberalization will be small, overall, and are likely to be negative for a significant number of developing countries. The Doha Round focuses on tariff issues, but these countries currently have practically duty-free access to European and North American markets under preferential regimes. Multilateral liberalization will erode the benefits of these preferences, which are presently rather well utilized in the agricultural sector. The main obstacles to the exports of the poorest countries appear to be in the non-tariff area (sanitary, phytosanitary standards) which increasingly originate from the private sector and are not dealt with under the Doha framework (traceability requirements, etc.). An agreement in Doha is unlikely to solve these problems and open large markets for the poorest countries. While this is not an argument to give up multilateral liberalization, a more specific and differentiated treatment should be considered in WTO rules, and corrective measures should be implemented.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark with number 24628.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae05:24628

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Related research

Keywords: agricultural trade liberalization; WTO; developing countries; International Development; International Relations/Trade; F13; Q17;

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References

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  1. Jean-Christophe Bureau & Antoine Bouet, Yvan Decreux, Sébastien Jean, 2005. "Multilateral agricultural trade liberalization: The contrasting fortunes of developing countries in the Doha Round," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp060, IIIS.
  2. Arvind Panagariya, 2003. "Aid through Trade: An effective option," International Trade 0308011, EconWPA.
  3. Diao, Xinshen & Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio & Robinson, Sherman & Orden, David, 2005. "Tell me where it hurts, an' I'll tell you who to call," MTID discussion papers 84, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Timothy E. Josling & Donna Roberts & David Orden, 2004. "Food Regulation and Trade: Toward a Safe and Open Global System," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 347.
  5. Valenzuela, Ernesto & Hertel, Thomas W. & Ivanic, Maros & Nin Pratt, Alejandro, 2004. "Evaluating Poverty Impacts of Globalization and Trade Policy Changes on Agricultural Producers," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20242, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  6. Joseph Francois & Hans van Meijl, 2003. "Economic Implications of Trade Liberalization Under the Doha Round," Working Papers 2003-20, CEPII research center.
  7. Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Salvatici, Luca, 2002. "WTO Negotiations on Market Access in Agriculture: A Comparison of Alternative Tariff Cut Scenarios for the EU and the US," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24883, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  8. Stephen Tokarick, 2003. "Measuring the Impact of Distortions in Agricultural Trade in Partial and General Equilibrium," IMF Working Papers 03/110, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Daniel A. Sumner, 2003. "Implications of the US Farm Bill of 2002 for agricultural trade and trade negotiations," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(1), pages 99-122, 03.
  10. Brenton, Paul, 2003. "Integrating the least developed countries into the world trading system : the current impact of EU preferences under everything but arms," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3018, The World Bank.
  11. Winnie Mitullah, 2000. "Food Safety Requirements and Food Exports from Developing Countries: The Case of Fish Exports from Kenya to the European Union," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1159-1169.
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Cited by:
  1. Abdel Karim, Imad Eldin Elfadil & Abler, David G., 2008. "Implications of a Doha Agreement on Agricultural Markets in Sudan," Working Papers 37918, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  2. Susan Senior Nello, 2007. "Winners and Losers from World Agricultural Trade Liberalisation," RSCAS Working Papers 2007/18, European University Institute.
  3. Douillet, Mathilde, 2012. "Trade policy reforms in the new agricultural context: Is regional integration a priority for Sub-Saharan African countries agricultural-led industrialization? Insights from a global computable general," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126546, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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