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Multilateral Agricultural Trade Liberalisation: The Contrasting Fortunes of Developing Countries in the Doha Round

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  • Antoine Bou�t
  • Jean-Christophe Bureau
  • Yvan Decreux
  • Sébastien Jean

Abstract

An applied general equilibrium model is used to assess the impact of multilateral trade liberalisation in agriculture, with particular emphasis on developing countries. We use original data, and the model includes some specific features such as a dual labour market. Applied tariffs, including those under preferential regimes and regional agreements, are taken into account at the detailed product level, together with the corresponding bound tariffs on which countries negotiate. The various types of farm support are detailed, and several groups of developing countries are distinguished. Simulations give a contrasted picture of the benefits developing countries would draw from the Doha development round. The results suggest that previous studies have neglected preferential agreements and the binding overhang (in tariffs as well as domestic support), and have treated developing countries with a high level of aggregation and been excessively optimistic about the actual benefits of multilateral trade liberalisation. Regions like sub-Saharan Africa are more likely to suffer from the erosion of existing preferences. The main gainers of the Doha Round are likely to be developed countries and Cairns Group members. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2005.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal World Economy.

Volume (Year): 28 (2005)
Issue (Month): 9 (09)
Pages: 1329-1354

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Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:28:y:2005:i:9:p:1329-1354

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  1. Hervé Boulhol, 2004. "Technology Differences, Institutions and Economic Growth: a Conditional Conditional Convergence," Working Papers 2004-02, CEPII research center.
  2. Soledad Zignago & Lionel Fontagné & Thierry Mayer, 2005. "Trade in the Triad: how easy is the access to large markets?," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/10189, Sciences Po.
  3. Lionel Fontagné & Jean-Louis Guérin & Sébastien Jean, 2005. "Market Access Liberalisation in the Doha Round: Scenarios and Assessment," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(8), pages 1073-1094, 08.
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