Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Trade liberalisation under the Doha Development Agenda Options and consequences for Africa

Contents:

Author Info

  • Tom Achterbosch

    (LEI)

  • Hakim Ben Hammouda

    (UNECA)

  • Patrick Osakwe

    (UNECA)

  • Frank van Tongeren

    (LEI)

Abstract

This study provides a quantitative estimate of the potential economic consequences of multilateral trade reform under the WTO for Africa using a framework that explicitly incorporates issues of concern to the region, such as preference erosion, loss of tariff revenue, and trade facilitation. It also examines the impact of OECD agricultural support programmes on economic welfare and specialisation in Africa. In the static version of the GTAP model, the study finds that full liberalisation of trade would increase global welfare (income) by 0.3 per cent, but would add 0.7 per cent annually to income in the African region. Sub-Saharan Africa and, to a lesser extent, Southern Africa, are vulnerable to partial trade reforms as they incur losses from partial reform while all other regions derive positive gains from a liberalisation of minor scope.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/it/papers/0407/0407013.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series International Trade with number 0407013.

as in new window
Length: 90 pages
Date of creation: 28 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0407013

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 90. Joint study of United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and the Agricultural Economcis Research Institute (LEI) The Netherlands. General equilibium model of trade and production. Simulates possible effects of WTO-Doha agreement on African countries. Takes into acount existing trade preferces (GSP, ACP ect.) and existing binding overhang.
Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: international trade; general equilibrium WTO; Doha round; Africa; agricultural policy;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Ottaviano, Gianmarco Ireo Paolo & Puga, Diego, 1997. "Agglomeration in the Global Economy: A Survey of the 'New Economic Geography'," CEPR Discussion Papers 1699, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Smith, M A M, 1977. "Capital Accumulation in the Open Two-Sector Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 87(346), pages 273-82, June.
  3. Ianchovichina, Elena & Mattoo, Aaditya & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2001. "Unrestricted Market Access for Sub-Saharan Africa: How Much is it Worth and Who Pays?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2820, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Antoine Bouët & Lionel Fontagné & Mondher Mimouni & Xavier Pichot, 2001. "Market Access Maps: A Bilateral and Disaggregated Measure of Market Access," Working Papers 2001-18, CEPII research center.
  5. Joseph Francois & Will Martin, 2003. "Formula Approaches for Market Access Negotiations," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(1), pages 1-28, January.
  6. John C. Beghin & Ataman Aksoy, 2003. "Agricultural Trade and the Doha Round: Lessons from Commodity Studies," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 03-bp42, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
  7. Achterbosch, Thom J. & de Bruin, S. & van Tongeren, Frank W., 2003. "Trade Preferences For Developing Countries," Report Series 29102, Agricultural Economics Research Institute.
  8. J. Francois & H. van Meijl & F. van Tongeren, 2003. "Trade Liberalization and Developing Countries under the Doha Round," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-060/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 30 Aug 2003.
  9. Bernard Hoekman & Francis Ng & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2002. "Eliminating Excessive Tariffs on Exports of Least Developed Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(1), pages 1-21, June.
  10. Tom Achterbosch & Hakim Ben Hammouda & Patrick Osakwe & Frank van Tongeren, 2004. "Trade liberalisation under the Doha Development Agenda Options and consequences for Africa," International Trade 0407013, EconWPA.
  11. Hans van Meijl & Frank van Tongeren, 2002. "The Agenda 2000 CAP reform, world prices and GATT--WTO export constraints," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 445-470, December.
  12. Francisco Rodriguez & Dani Rodrik, 1999. "Trade Policy and Economic Growth: a Skeptic's Guide to the Cross-National Evidence," Working Papers 9912, Economic Research Forum, revised Apr 1999.
  13. William Cline, 2002. "An Index of Industrial Country Trade Policy Toward Developing Countries," Working Papers 14, Center for Global Development.
  14. Scott McDonald & Terrie Walmsley, 2004. "Preferential Trade Agreements and the Optimal Liberalisation of Agricultural Trade," Working Papers 2004010, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2004.
  15. W. Jill Harrison & J. Mark Horridge & K.R. Pearson, 2000. "Decomposing Simulation Results with Respect to Exogenous Shocks," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 227-249, June.
  16. Smith, M. A. M., 1976. "Trade, growth and consumption in alternative models of capital accumulation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 371-384, November.
  17. Francois, Joseph & Bradley McDonald, 1996. "Liberalization and Capital Accumulation in the GTAP Model," GTAP Technical Papers 310, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  18. Will Martin, 2003. "Developing Countries' Changing Participation in World Trade," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 18(2), pages 187-203.
  19. Peter Walkenhorst & Nora Dihel, 2003. "Tariff Bindings, Unused Protection and Agricultural Trade Liberalisation," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2003(1), pages 231-249.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Ben Hammouda, Hakim & Osakwe, Patrick N., 2006. "Global Trade Models and Economic Policy Analyses: Relevance, Risks and Repercussions for Africa," MPRA Paper 1851, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Tom Achterbosch & Hakim Ben Hammouda & Patrick Osakwe & Frank van Tongeren, 2004. "Trade liberalisation under the Doha Development Agenda Options and consequences for Africa," International Trade 0407013, EconWPA.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0407013. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.