Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

A Latent-Variable Approach to Modelling Multiple and Resurgent Meat Scares in Italy

Contents:

Author Info

  • Mazzocchi, Mario
  • Lobb, Alexandra E.

Abstract

This paper aims to measure the time pattern of multiple and resurgent food scares and their direct and cross-product impacts on consumer response. The Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) is augmented by a flexible stochastic framework which has no need for additional explanatory variables such as a media index. Italian aggregate household data on meat demand is used to assess the time-varying impact of a resurgent BSE crisis (1996 and 2000) and the 1999 Dioxin crisis. The impact of the first BSE crisis on preferences seems to be reabsorbed after a few months. The second wave of the scare at the end of 2000 had a much stronger effect on preferences and the positive shift in chicken demand continued to persist after the onset of the crisis. Empirical results show little relevance of the Dioxin crisis in terms of preference shift, whilst not excluding the more relevant price effect.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/24509
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark with number 24509.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae05:24509

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.eaae.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: meat demand; BSE; shock; Almost Ideal Demand System; Kalman filter; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; D12; I12;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Alessie, Rob & Kapteyn, Arie, 1991. "Habit Formation, Interdependent References and Demographic Effects in the Almost Ideal Demand System," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(406), pages 404-19, May.
  2. Nicholas E. Piggott & Thomas L. Marsh, 2004. "Does Food Safety Information Impact U.S. Meat Demand?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 154-174.
  3. Foster, William & Just, Richard E., 1989. "Measuring welfare effects of product contamination with consumer uncertainty," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 266-283, November.
  4. Watson, Mark W. & Engle, Robert F., 1983. "Alternative algorithms for the estimation of dynamic factor, mimic and varying coefficient regression models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 385-400, December.
  5. Philippe J. Deschamps, 2003. "Time-varying intercepts and equilibrium analysis: an extension of the dynamic almost ideal demand model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 209-236.
  6. Mario Mazzocchi, 2003. "Time-varying coefficients in the Almost Ideal Demand System: an empirical appraisal," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 241-270, June.
  7. Beverly Tepper & Lee Rosenzweig, 1999. "Assessing the importance of health and nutrition related factors on food demand: a variable preference investigation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(12), pages 1541-1549.
  8. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  9. Thomas Marsh & Ted Schroeder & James Mintert, 2004. "Impacts of meat product recalls on consumer demand in the USA," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 897-909.
  10. Iain Fraser & Imad A. Moosa, 2002. "Demand Estimation in the Presence of Stochastic Trend and Seasonality: The Case of Meat Demand in the United Kingdom," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(1), pages 83-89.
  11. M.-J.J. Mangen & A.M. Burrell, 2001. "Decomposing Preference Shifts for Meat and Fish in the Netherlands," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 16-28.
  12. David G. Swartz & Ivar E. Strand, Jr., 1981. "Avoidance Costs Associated with Imperfect Information: The Case of Kepone," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 57(2), pages 139-150.
  13. Verbeke, Wim & Ward, Ronald W., 2001. "A fresh meat almost ideal demand system incorporating negative TV press and advertising impact," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 359-374, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Ding, Yulian & Veeman, Michele M. & Adamowicz, Wiktor L., 2009. "BSE and the Dynamics of Beef Consumption: Influences of Habit and Trust," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49284, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaae05:24509. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.