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Impact of Food Contamination on Brands: A Demand Systems Estimation of Peanut Butter

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  • Bakhtavoryan, Rafael
  • Capps, Oral, Jr.
  • Salin, Victoria
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    Abstract

    A 2007 food-borne illness incident involving peanut butter is linked with structural change in consumer demand. Compensated and uncompensated own- and cross-price elasticities and expenditure elasticities were calculated for leading brands before and after the product recall using the Barten synthetic model and weekly time-series data from 2006 through 2008. Statistically significant differences in price elasticities for the affected brand, Peter Pan, were absent. After a period of 27 weeks, this brand essentially recovered from the food safety crisis. Significant differences in price elasticities were evident among non-affected brands. Hence, spillover effects and heightened competition are associated with the recall.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 (December)
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:141695

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    Web page: http://www.narea.org/
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    Related research

    Keywords: food safety; 2007 Peter Pan recall; demand system models; scanner data; Agribusiness; Consumer/Household Economics; Demand and Price Analysis; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Health Economics and Policy; Marketing;

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    1. Thomas Marsh & Ted Schroeder & James Mintert, 2004. "Impacts of meat product recalls on consumer demand in the USA," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 897-909.
    2. Verbeke, Wim & Ward, Ronald W., 2001. "A fresh meat almost ideal demand system incorporating negative TV press and advertising impact," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 359-374, September.
    3. Keller, W.J. & Van Driel, J., 1985. "Differential consumer demand systems," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 375-390.
    4. Hikaru Hanawa Peterson & Yun-Ju (Kelly) Chen, 2005. "The impact of BSE on Japanese retail meat demand," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 313-327.
    5. Capps, Oral, Jr. & Schmitz, John D., 1991. "A Recognition Of Health And Nutrition Factors In Food Demand Analysis," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 16(01), July.
    6. Robin Dillaway & Kent D. Messer & John C. Bernard & Harry M. Kaiser, 2011. "Do Consumer Responses to Media Food Safety Information Last?," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(3), pages 363-383.
    7. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
    8. Nicholas E. Piggott & Thomas L. Marsh, 2004. "Does Food Safety Information Impact U.S. Meat Demand?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 154-174.
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