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Tim Leunig

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Personal Details

First Name: Tim
Middle Name:
Last Name: Leunig
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RePEc Short-ID: ple341

Email:
Homepage: http://www.leunig.net
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Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Works

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Working papers

  1. Alexander Klein & Tim Leunig, 2013. "Gibrat's law and the British Industrial Revolution," Studies in Economics 1314, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  2. Björn Erikssoon & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2012. "Sexism at work," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 385, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2011. "Gender, Productivity and the Nature of Work and Pay: Evidence from the Late Nineteenth-Century Tobacco Industry," CEP Discussion Papers dp1053, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Tim Leunig, 2011. "Cart or Horse: Transport and Economic Growth," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/4, OECD Publishing.
  5. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "In brief...Cotton and Cars: the Huge Gains from Process Innovation," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 347, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "Spinning Welfare: the Gains from Process Innovation in Cotton and Car Production," CEP Discussion Papers dp1050, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Tim Leunig, 2011. "Measuring economic performance and social progress," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37234, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  8. Nicholas Crafts & Tim Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2010. "Were British railway companies well-managed in the early twentieth century?," Economic History Working Papers 27889, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  9. Tim Leunig, 2010. "Social savings," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30135, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  10. Tim Leunig & Chris Minns & Patrick Wallis, 2009. "Networks in the Premodern Economy: the Market for London Apprenticeships, 1600-1749," CEP Discussion Papers dp0956, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  11. Tim Leunig, 2009. "In brief: Train times," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 275, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  12. Jane Humphries & Tim Leunig, 2007. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind?: anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London," Economic History Working Papers 22317, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  13. J.Humphries & T. Leunig, 2007. "Cities, Market Integration and Going to Sea: Stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth-century England and Wales," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _066, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  14. Tim Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Comment on Oxley’s "Seat of death and terror"," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 500, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  15. Tim Leunig, 2005. "Time is money: a re-assessment of the passenger social savings from Victorian British railways," Economic History Working Papers 22551, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  16. Tim Leunig, 2003. "Piece rates and learning: understanding work and production in the New England textile industry a century ago," Economic History Working Papers 22360, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  17. Tim Leunig, 2003. "A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 494, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  18. Tim Leunig, 2002. "Can profitable arbitrage opportunities in the raw cotton market explain Britain’s continued preference for mule spinning?," Economic History Working Papers 515, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  19. Tim Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2001. "Smallpox really did reduce height : a reply to Razzell," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 496, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  20. Tim Leunig, 2001. "Britannia ruled the waves," Economic History Working Papers 536, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  21. Tim Leunig, 2000. "New answers to old questions: explaining the slow adoption of ring spinning in Lancashire, 1880-1913," Economic History Working Papers 22378, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  22. Tim Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 1998. "Smallpox did reduce height : a reply to our critics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 495, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  23. Tim Leunig, 1998. "New Answers to Old Questions: Transport Costs and the Slow Adoption of Ring Spinning in Lancashire," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _022, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  24. Hans-Joachim Voth & Tim Leunig, 1996. "Did smallpox reduce height?: stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 497, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    RePEc:cge:warwcg:145 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. Tim Leunig, 2012. "The Liberal Democrats And Supply-Side Economics," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 17-20, 06.
  2. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2011. "Corrigendum: Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(1), pages 351-356, February.
  3. Leunig, Tim, 2011. "Measuring economic performance and social progress," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(02), pages 357-363, August.
  4. Leunig, Tim & Minns, Chris & Wallis, Patrick, 2011. "Networks in the Premodern Economy: The Market for London Apprenticeships, 1600–1749," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(02), pages 413-443, June.
  5. Tim Leunig, 2010. "Social Savings," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 775-800, December.
  6. Steckel, Richard H. & Leunig, Tim, 2010. "Preface," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 259-259, July.
  7. Jane Humphries & Tim Leunig, 2009. "Cities, market integration, and going to sea: stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth-century England and Wales -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(2), pages 458-478, 05.
  8. Humphries, Jane & Leunig, Timothy, 2009. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind? Anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 120-131, January.
  9. Tim Leunig & Henry Overman, 2008. "Spatial patterns of development and the British housing market," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 59-78, spring.
  10. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2008. "Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century? -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(4), pages 842-866, November.
  11. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Comment on 'Seat of Death and Terror' -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 59(3), pages 607-616, 08.
  12. Leunig, Timothy, 2006. "Time is Money: A Re-Assessment of the Passenger Social Savings from Victorian British Railways," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 635-673, September.
  13. Timothy Leunig, 2003. "A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 56(1), pages 90-117, 02.
  14. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2001. "Smallpox really did reduce height: a reply to Razzell," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 54(1), pages 110-114, 02.
  15. Leunig, Timothy, 2001. "NEW ANSWERS TO OLD QUESTIONS: EXPLAINING THE SLOW ADOPTION OF RING SPINNING IN LANCASHIRE, 1880 l913," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(02), pages 439-466, June.
  16. Leunig, Tim, 1999. "The Prothictivity Race: BritishManifacturingin International Perspective, 1850–1990. By S. N. Broadberry. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Pp. xxv, 451. £45.00, $74.95," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(01), pages 215-216, March.
  17. Leunig, Tim, 1998. "The People and the British Economy, 1830–1914. By Roderick Floud. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997. Pp. x, 218. $15.95, paper," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(03), pages 881-882, September.
  18. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 1998. "Smallpox Did Reduce Height: A Reply to Our Critics," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 51(2), pages 372-381, 05.
  19. Leunig, Tim, 1997. "The Lancashire Cotton Industry: A History Since 1700. Edited by Mary Rose. Preston: Lancashire County Books, 1996. Pp. xii, 404. £24.95, cloth; £14.95, paper," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(04), pages 964-965, December.
  20. Hans-Joachim Voth & Timothy Leunig, 1996. "Did smallpox reduce height? Stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 49(3), pages 541-560, 08.

NEP Fields

11 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (3) 2013-01-07 2013-08-16 2013-09-06. Author is listed
  2. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2011-08-22
  3. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (3) 2013-09-06 2013-10-02 2014-04-18. Author is listed
  4. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2014-04-18
  5. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (10) 2008-05-10 2010-01-16 2011-05-30 2011-06-11 2011-11-07 2013-01-07 2013-08-16 2013-09-06 2013-10-02 2014-04-18. Author is listed
  6. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2011-06-11
  7. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2011-06-11 2013-01-07
  8. NEP-INO: Innovation (2) 2011-05-30 2011-11-07
  9. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2011-06-11 2013-01-07
  10. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2010-01-16
  11. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (3) 2013-08-16 2013-10-02 2014-04-18. Author is listed
  12. NEP-SPO: Sports & Economics (1) 2013-08-16
  13. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (7) 2008-05-10 2010-01-16 2011-08-22 2013-08-16 2013-09-06 2013-10-02 2014-04-18. Author is listed

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