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Growth and Poverty Reduction : Case Studies from West Africa

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  • Quentin Wodon

Abstract

The objective of this volume is to assess the relationships between growth and poverty reduction on the basis of a number of case studies, all but one of which are based on recent household survey data. The first part of the volume presents data on Ghana and Senegal, two countries that have benefited from high levels of growth over the last dozen years. The analysis suggests that growth led to substantial reductions in the share of the population in poverty. Yet growth could not be said to be "pro-poor" because the gains in consumption for better off households were proportionately larger than the gains for poorer households. In the second part of the volume, case studies for Burkina Faso and Cape Verde are presented to solve the paradox of high growth without poverty reduction. It was initially believed in both countries that there had been no poverty reduction despite high growth during the 1990s. Yet a closer examination of the data suggests that this paradox was actually due to measurement errors: more careful work confirmed that poverty reduction was substantial. The third and last part of the volume presents case studies for Guinea-Bissau and Nigeria on the impediments to growth, with a focus on the negative impact of conflict and macroeconomic volatility on growth, and thereby on poverty. Overall, this volume makes a strong case for the positive impact of growth for the reduction in income and consumption poverty in West Africa but it also points to the need to pay close attention to changes in inequality as such changes have limited the gains from growth for the poor in several of the countries considered here.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 6875 and published in 2007.

ISBN: 0-8213-6629-7
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6875

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Related research

Keywords: Poverty Reduction - Achieving Shared Growth Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Economic Conditions and Volatility Poverty Reduction - Rural Poverty Reduction Health; Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Health; Nutrition and Population;

References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Francisco Rodriguez & Dani Rodrik, 1999. "Trade Policy and Economic Growth: A Skeptic's Guide to Cross-National Evidence," NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 7081, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Lloyd Ahamefule Amaghionyeodiwe & Tokunbo Simbowale Osinubi, 2004. "Poverty reduction Policies and Pro-Poor Growth in Nigeria," Brazilian Electronic Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Department of Economics, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, vol. 6(1), February.
  3. Bleaney, Michael & Greenaway, David, 2001. "The impact of terms of trade and real exchange rate volatility on investment and growth in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 491-500, August.
  4. Mankiw, N Gregory & Romer, David & Weil, David N, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-37, May.
  5. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
  6. Easterly, William & Rebelo, Sergio, 1993. "Fiscal policy and economic growth: An empirical investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 417-458, December.
  7. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Aigbokhan, B.E., 2000. "Poverty, Growth and Inequality in Nigeria: A Case Study," Papers, African Economic Research Consortium 102, African Economic Research Consortium.
  9. Paul Makdissi & Quentin Wodon, 2003. "Risk-adjusted measures of wage inequality and safety nets," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, AccessEcon, vol. 9(1), pages 1-10.
  10. Easterly, William & Kremer, Michael & Pritchett, Lant & Summers, Lawrence H., 1993. "Good policy or good luck?: Country growth performance and temporary shocks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 459-483, December.
  11. Rodríguez, Francisco & Rodrik, Dani, 1999. "Trade Policy and Economic Growth: A Sceptic's Guide to the Cross-National Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 2143, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Deb, Partha & Sefton, Martin, 1996. "The distribution of a Lagrange multiplier test of normality," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 123-130, May.
  13. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:9:y:2003:i:1:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-66, May.
  15. Paul Cashin & Catherine A. Pattillo, 2000. "Terms of Trade Shocks in Africa," IMF Working Papers, International Monetary Fund 00/72, International Monetary Fund.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Wodon, Quentin, 2007. "Growth and Poverty Reduction in West Africa: A Brief Overview," MPRA Paper, University Library of Munich, Germany 11086, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Nouve, Kofi & Bambio, Yiriyibin & Kabore, Samuel & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Risque et mesures de la pauvreté rurale au Burkina Faso
    [Risk and Measures of Rural Poverty in Burkina Faso]
    ," MPRA Paper, University Library of Munich, Germany 34374, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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