Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Cape Verde and Mozambique as Development Successes in West and Southern Africa

Contents:

Author Info

  • Jorge Braga de Macedo
  • Luís Brites Pereira

Abstract

This paper applies an interpretation of how globalization and governance (G&G) interact with convergence given Cape Verde and Mozambique’s particular geographical and historical contexts. We hold that development success under globalization entails, necessarily but not exclusively, positive market perceptions regarding the orientation and predictability of policies as well as the accompanying institutional arrangements. As such, a positive G&G interaction with respect to a comparator group can usefully be defined as success notwithstanding the inexistence of a universally applicable development model. In practical terms, we first identify macro-level policy and institutional combinations underpinning successful trade diversification (an indicator of globalization) and income convergence (an indicator of governance) in the sub-regions of West and Southern Africa. We then assess to what extent these combinations apply to both countries using an empirical analysis. We find that trade openness drives convergence and export diversification in Western Africa (which is becoming more diversified) while convergence is instead driven by economic and political freedoms in Southern Africa (which is becoming more specialized). Our empirical analysis is complemented by a case-study narrative of Cape Verde and Mozambique’s long-term development, which allows us to also identify the following common drivers: moving towards a market economy; opening up to regional and global trade; increasing economic and political freedom; pursing macroeconomic stability and financial reputation; ensuring policy continuity (especially in the industrial and trade sectors) and focusing on human development (especially education and poverty reduction). Moreover, both countries reveal convergence compared to their sub-regional peers when looking at average GDP per capita and indicators of financial reputation and good governance. While these findings are insufficient to conclude that convergence will be sustained, the positive interaction between trade and financial globalization, on the one hand, and good governance and democracy, on the other, may help explain the observed diversity of the Portuguese-speaking African community, which includes three other countries (Angola, Guinea-Bissau and São Tomé e Príncipe).

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w16552.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16552.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Nov 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming: Cape Verde and Mozambique as Development Successes in West and Southern Africa , Jorge Braga de Macedo, Luís Brites Pereira. in African Successes: Sustainable Growth , Edwards, Johnson, and Weil. 2014
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16552

Note: IFM
Contact details of provider:
Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Phone: 617-868-3900
Email:
Web page: http://www.nber.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March.
  2. repec:fth:oxesaf:99-18 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Collier, Paul & Gunning, Jan Willem, 1999. "The IMF's Role in Structural Adjustment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(459), pages F634-51, November.
  4. Torsten Persson & Guido Tabellini, 2006. "Democratic capital: The nexus of political and economic change," Working Papers 308, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  5. Miklos Koren & Silvana Tenreyro, 2005. "Volatility and Development," CEP Discussion Papers dp0706, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Anke E. Hoeffler, 2000. "The Augmented Solow Model and the African Growth Debate," CID Working Papers 36, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  7. Aleksandra Parteka, 2010. "Employment and export specialisation along the development path: some robust evidence," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 145(4), pages 615-640, January.
  8. John M. Luiz, 2009. "Institutions and economic performance: Implications for African development," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 58-75.
  9. Federico Bonaglia & Jorge Braga de Macedo & Maurizio Bussolo, 2001. "How Globalisation Improves Governance," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 181, OECD Publishing.
  10. Barry Eichengreen & David Leblang, 2008. "Democracy And Globalization," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 289-334, November.
  11. Jorge Braga de Macedo & Luis Pereira & Afonso Reis, 2009. "Comparing Exchange Market Pressure across Five African Countries," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 20(5), pages 645-682, November.
  12. Hausmann, Ricardo & Rodrik, Dani, 2002. "Economic Development as Self Discovery," CEPR Discussion Papers 3356, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Cabral, Manuel Heredia Caldeira & Veiga, Paula, 2010. "Determinants Of Export Diversification And Sophistication In Sub-Saharan Africa," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp550, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  14. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 8973.
  15. Federico Bonaglia & Kichiro Fukasaku, 2003. "Export Diversification In Low-Income Countries: An International Challenge After Doha," Development and Comp Systems 0307001, EconWPA.
  16. Adam Przeworski & Fernando Limongi, 1993. "Political Regimes and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 51-69, Summer.
  17. Macedo, Jorge Braga de, 2010. "Global crisis and national policy responses: together alone?," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp546, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  18. Luca De Benedictis & Marco Gallegati & Massimo Tamberi, 2006. "Overall Specialization and Income: Countries Diversity," Working Papers 37-2006, Macerata University, Department of Finance and Economic Sciences, revised Oct 2008.
  19. Fedderke, J. W. & de Kadt, R. H. J. & Luiz, J. M., 2001. "Indicators of political liberty, property rights and political instability in South Africa: 1935-97," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 103-134, March.
  20. Paulo Bastos, & Manuel Cabral, . "The Dynamics of International Trade Patterns," Discussion Papers 07/06, University of Nottingham, GEP.
  21. Dierk Herzer & Nowak-Lehnmann Felicitas, 2006. "What does export diversification do for growth? An econometric analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(15), pages 1825-1838.
  22. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Preface," MPRA Paper 17451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  23. Macedo, Jorge Braga de & Pereira, Luis Brites, 2006. "The Credibility of Cabo Verde’s Currency Peg," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp494, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  24. Angel-Urdinola, Diego & Wodon, Quentin, 2007. "Assessing Absolute and Relative Poverty Trends with Limited Data in Cape Verde," MPRA Paper 11111, University Library of Munich, Germany.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Jorge Braga de Macedo, 2012. "Cape Verde’s foreign policy: an economic perspective," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp572, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  2. Frankel, Jeffrey A., 2010. "Mauritius: African Success Story," Scholarly Articles 4450110, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16552. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.