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Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara

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  • Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin
    ()
  • Gruère, Guillaume P.
  • Sithole-Niang, Idah

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Abstract

A variable climate, political instability, and other constraints have limited agricultural development in African countries south of the Sahara. Genetically modified (GM) crops are one tool for enhancing agricultural productivity and food security despite such constraints. Genetically Modified Crops in Africa: Economic and Policy Lessons from Countries South of the Sahara investigates how this tool might be effectively used by evaluating the benefits, costs, and risks for African countries of adopting GM crops. The authors gather together studies on GM crops’ economic effects and impact on trade, how consumers view such crops, and other issues. They find that GM crops have had, on average, a positive economic effect in the nations where they were used and identify future steps for enhancing GM crop adoption’s positive effects. Promising policy initiatives include making biosafety regulations that do not make GM crop development prohibitively expensive, fostering intraregional trade in GM crops, and providing more and better information about GM crops to consumers who might currently be skeptical of them. These and other findings in Genetically Modified Crops in Africa indicate ways biotechnology can contribute to economic development in Africa south of the Sahara.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI books with number 978-0-89629-795-1 and published in 2013.

Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprib:9780896297951

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Related research

Keywords: Uganda; South Africa; East Africa; Southern Africa; Africa south of Sahara; Africa; biotechnology; Transgenic plants; Risk assessment; Economic aspects; Biosafety regulations; Biotechnological safety; socioeconomic development; Genetically engineered organisms; Genetically modified foods; Data collection; genetic heterogeneity; ex-ante impact assessment; ex-post impact assessment; Developing countries; bt Cotton; maize; banana; Agricultural research;

References

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  1. Bett, Charles & Ouma, James Okuro & Groote, Hugo De, 2010. "Perspectives of gatekeepers in the Kenyan food industry towards genetically modified food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 332-340, August.
  2. Guillaume P. Gruère & Hiroyuki Takeshima, 2012. "Will They Stay or Will They Go? The Political Influence of GM-Averse Importing Companies on Biosafety Decision Makers in Africa," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 94(3), pages 736-749.
  3. Horna, Daniela & Smale, Melinda & Al-Hassan, Ramatu & Falck-Zepeda, José & Timpo, Samuel E., 2008. "Insecticide use on vegetables in Ghana: Would GM seed benefit farmers?," IFPRI discussion papers 785, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Kimenju, Simon Chege & De Groote, Hugo, 2005. "Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Genetically Modified Foods in Kenya," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24504, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  5. Horna, J. Daniela & Smale, Melinda & von Oppen, Matthias, 2005. "Farmer willingness to pay for seed-related information: rice varieties in Nigeria and Benin," EPTD discussion papers 142, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Horna, J. Daniela & Smale, Melinda, 2008. "Betting on cotton: Potential payoffs and economic risks of adopting transgenic cotton in West Africa," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(2), September.
  7. Smale, Melinda & Zambrano, Patricia & Gruère, Guillaume & Falck-Zepeda, José & Matuschke, Ira & Horna, Daniela & Nagarajan, Latha & Yerramareddy, Indira & Jones, Hannah, 2009. "Measuring the economic impacts of transgenic crops in developing agriculture during the first decade: Approaches, findings, and future directions," Food policy reviews 10, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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