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Enhancing Sustainability of Cotton Production Systems in West Africa: A Summary of Empirical Evidence from Burkina Faso

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Author Info

  • Jeffrey Vitale

    ()
    (Oklahoma State University, 308 Ag Hall, Stillwater, OK 74032, USA)

  • Marc Ouattarra

    ()
    (Research Scientist, Institute National Environment et Agricole (INERA), 01 BP 208, Bobo Dioulasso 01, Burkina Faso)

  • Gaspard Vognan

    ()
    (Research Scientist, Institute National Environment et Agricole (INERA), 01 BP 208, Bobo Dioulasso 01, Burkina Faso)

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    Abstract

    Africa has been hesitant to adopt agricultural biotechnology, lagging behind global trends over the past decade. One exception is Burkina Faso, a West African country that commercially released 125,000 ha of Bt cotton in 2009. Bt cotton may serve as a working example of how African countries can enhance sustainability using modern, science-driven technology to increase production levels while reducing input use and energy consumption. This paper reports the potential impact that Bt cotton can have on sustainability in Burkina Faso’s cotton sector based by summarizing empirical evidence from previously published studies. Based on the summary of published data collected from six years of field trials and producer surveys, Bt cotton increased cotton yields by an average of 21.3% and raised income by $106.14 per ha. Using an energy balance model, the introduction of Bt cotton would also result in a 6.6% saving in energy use. The significant increase in productivity and economic returns could be the catalyst for Burkina Faso, and other African countries, to emerge from the decade or so of stagnation and regain their competitive stance in world cotton markets while providing environmental and social benefits.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

    Volume (Year): 3 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 8 (July)
    Pages: 1136-1169

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    Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:3:y:2011:i:8:p:1136-1169:d:13344

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    Related research

    Keywords: Bt cotton; Burkina Faso; pesticide; adoption; sustainability; Bollgard II;

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    References

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    1. Richard Bennett & Stephen Morse & Yousouf Ismael, 2006. "The economic impact of genetically modified cotton on South African smallholders: Yield, profit and health effects," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 662-677.
    2. Pray, Carl & Ma, Danmeng & Huang, Jikun & Qiao, Fangbin, 2001. "Impact of Bt Cotton in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 813-825, May.
    3. Jikun Huang & Ruifa Hu & Carl Pray & Fangbin Qiao & Scott Rozelle, 2003. "Biotechnology as an alternative to chemical pesticides: a case study of Bt cotton in China," CEMA Working Papers 509, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    4. Bhavani Shankar & Colin Thirtle, 2005. "Pesticide Productivity and Transgenic Cotton Technology: The South African Smallholder Case," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 97-116.
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    7. Matin Qaim & Alain de Janvry, 2003. "Genetically Modified Crops, Corporate Pricing Strategies, and Farmers' Adoption: The Case of Bt Cotton in Argentina," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(4), pages 814-828.
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    11. Kirsten, Johann F. & Gouse, Marnus, 2002. "The Adoption And Impact Of Agricultural Biotechnology Innovations In South Africa," Working Papers 18054, University of Pretoria, Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development.
    12. Buttel, Frederick & Merrill, Jeanne & Chen, Lucy & Goldberger, Jessica & Hurley, Terrance M., 2005. "Bt Corn Farmer Compliance with Insect Resistance Management Requirements: Results from the 2002 Minnesota and Wisconsin Farm Polls," Staff Papers 13659, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    13. Jeffrey D. Vitale & Hamady Djourra & Aminata Sidibé, 2009. "Estimating the supply response of cotton and cereal crops in smallholder production systems: recent evidence from Mali," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 519-533, 09.
    14. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-417, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Gouzaye, Amadou & Vitale, Jeffrey D. & Epplin, Francis M. & Adam, Brian D. & Stoecker, Arthur L., 2013. "The Value of Price Stabilization Policy for Cotton Producers in Burkina Faso," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 142882, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. World Bank, 2013. "Burkina Faso : Determinants of Cereal Production, Stochastic Frontier Approach for Panel Data," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15990, The World Bank.

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