Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Policy Options to Reduce Ireland's Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Contents:

Author Info

  • Legge, Thomas
  • Scott, Susan
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    A side effect of the economic downturn since 2008 is that Ireland may meet its Kyoto Protocol commitment for 2008-2012 to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, but that its longer term targets for 2020 and beyond are still stringent. This paper addresses both the political challenge and the economic implications of moving to a low-carbon state. The cost of reducing carbon emissions varies widely and heavy costs could be incurred. A soundly based policy framework that keeps costs down is thus essential, while being mindful of effects on the economy and the vulnerable; the pause in economic growth provides an opportunity for long-term planning. The criteria for policy are primarily threefold: regulatory certainty, including protection from short-term political interference; clearly defined incentives that ensure a credible, long-term price of carbon; and a transparent, dynamic and fair process with which the public can engage. The roles of various policy instruments are discussed, including regulatory and market-based instruments, subsidies and taxation.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.esri.ie/UserFiles/publications/20090728100858/RS009.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    as in new window
    This book is provided by Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) in its series Research Series with number RS9 and published in 2009.

    Handle: RePEc:esr:resser:rs009

    Note: Publisher: ESRI
    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Whitaker Square, Sir John Rogerson's Quay, Dublin 2
    Phone: (353-1) 863 2000
    Fax: (353-1) 863 2100
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.esri.ie
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. John FitzGerald & Mary Keeney & Sue Scott, 2009. "Assessing vulnerability of selected sectors under environmental tax reform: the issue of pricing power," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(3), pages 413-433.
    2. Josh Ederington & Jenny Minier, 2000. "Is Environmental Policy a Secondary Trade Barrier? An Empirical Analysis," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1507, Econometric Society.
    3. List, John A. & Co, Catherine Y., 2000. "The Effects of Environmental Regulations on Foreign Direct Investment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-20, July.
    4. FitzGerald, John & Bergin, Adele & Conefrey, Thomas & Diffney, Sean & Duffy, David & Kearney, Ide & Lyons, Sean & Malaguzzi Valeri, Laura & Mayor, Karen & Richard S. J. Tol, 2008. "Medium-Term Review 2008-2015, No. 11," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number MTR11, March.
    5. Barker, Terry & Junankar, Sudhir & Pollitt, Hector & Summerton, Philip, 2007. "Carbon leakage from unilateral Environmental Tax Reforms in Europe, 1995-2005," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6281-6292, December.
    6. Ismer, R. & Neuhoff, K., 2004. "Border Tax Adjustments: A feasible way to address nonparticipation in Emission Trading," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0409, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    7. Thomas Conefrey & John FitzGerald & Laura Malaguzzi Valeri & Richard S. J. Tol, 2008. "The Impact of a Carbon Tax on Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Ireland," Papers WP251, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. Jordan Carroll-Larson & Arthur Caplan, 2009. "Estimating the effectiveness of a vehicle miles travelled tax in reducing particulate matter emissions," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(3), pages 315-344.
    9. Lyons, Sean & FitzGerald, John & McCarthy, Niamh & Malaguzzi Valeri, Laura & Tol, Richard S. J., 2007. "Preserving Electricity Market Efficiency While Closing Ireland's Capacity Gap," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), vol. 2007(3-Autumn), pages 62-82.
    10. Arik Levinson & M. Scott Taylor, 2008. "Unmasking The Pollution Haven Effect," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(1), pages 223-254, 02.
    11. FitzGerald, John & Keeney, Mary & Scott, Susan, 2009. "Assessing Vulnerability of Selected Sectors under Environmental Tax Reform," Papers RB2009/2/2, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    12. Zhang, ZhongXiang & Baranzini, Andrea, 2004. "What do we know about carbon taxes? An inquiry into their impacts on competitiveness and distribution of income," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 507-518, March.
    13. Levinson, Arik, 1996. "Environmental regulations and manufacturers' location choices: Evidence from the Census of Manufactures," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1-2), pages 5-29, October.
    14. Paul Veenendaal & Ton Manders, 2008. "Border tax adjustment and the EU-ETS, a quantitative assessment," CPB Document 171, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    15. Tol, Richard S. J., 2008. "Intra-Union Flexibility of Non-ETS Emission Reduction Obligations in the European Union," Papers WP256, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    16. Dieter Helm, 2008. "Climate-change policy: why has so little been achieved?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 211-238, Summer.
    17. Andreas Waldkirch & Munisamy Gopinath, 2004. "Pollution Haven or Hythe? New Evidence from Mexico," International Trade 0412005, EconWPA.
    18. Scott, Susan & Feeney, Bernard, 1998. "Redirecting Transport Taxes," Papers BP1999/4, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    19. FitzGerald, John & McCoy, Daniel, 1992. "The Economic Effects of Carbon Taxes," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS14.
    20. Scott, S., 1997. "Household energy efficiency in Ireland: A replication study of ownership of energy saving items," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 187-208, May.
    21. John FitzGerald & Jonathan Hore & Ide Kearney, 2002. "A Model for Forecasting Energy Demand and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Ireland," Papers WP146, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    22. Fischer, Carolyn & Newell, Richard, 2004. "Environmental and Technology Policies for Climate Mitigation," Discussion Papers dp-04-05, Resources For the Future.
    23. repec:esr:chaptr:jacb199812 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Eli Berman & Linda T.M. Bui, 1998. "Environmental Regulation and Productivity: Evidence from Oil Refineries," Papers 0091, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
    25. Tim Callan & Sean Lyons & Sue Scott & Richard S. J. Tol & Stefano Verde, 2008. "The Distributional Implications of a Carbon Tax in Ireland," Papers WP250, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    26. Bergin, Adele & Kearney, Ide & FitzGerald, John & FitzGerald, John, 2006. "Macroeconomic Impact," Book Chapters, in: Morgenroth, Edgar (ed.), Ex-Ante Evaluation of the Investment Priorities for the National Development Plan 2007-2013, chapter 5, pages 49-74 Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    27. Stavins, Robert, 1997. "Policy Instruments for Climate Change: How Can National Governments Address a Global Problem?," Discussion Papers dp-97-11, Resources For the Future.
    28. Ian W. H. Parry & Kenneth A. Small, 2005. "Does Britain or the United States Have the Right Gasoline Tax?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1276-1289, September.
    29. Weber, Christopher L. & Peters, Glen P., 2009. "Climate change policy and international trade: Policy considerations in the US," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 432-440, February.
    30. van Beers, Cees & van den Bergh, Jeroen C J M, 1997. "An Empirical Multi-country Analysis of the Impact of Environmental Regulations on Foreign Trade Flows," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 29-46.
    31. Barrett, Alan & Lawlor, John, 1995. "The Economics of Solid Waste Management in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS26.
    32. Ryan, Lisa & Convery, Frank & Ferreira, Susana, 2006. "Stimulating the use of biofuels in the European Union: Implications for climate change policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(17), pages 3184-3194, November.
    33. Larson, Donald F. & Ambrosi, Philippe & Dinar, Ariel & Rahman, Shaikh Mahfuzur & Entler, Rebecca, 2008. "A Review of Carbon Market Policies and Research," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 2(3), pages 177-236, November.
    34. Richard S. J. Tol & Tim Callan & Thomas Conefrey & John FitzGerald & Seán Lyons & Laura Malaguzzi Valeri & Susan Scott, 2008. "A Carbon Tax for Ireland," Papers WP246, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:esr:resser:rs009. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sarah Burns).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.