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Climate-change policy: why has so little been achieved?

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  • Dieter Helm

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oxrep/grn014
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Review of Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 24 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (Summer)
Pages: 211-238

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:24:y:2008:i:2:p:211-238

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Web page: http://oxrep.oupjournals.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Simon Dietz & David Maddison, 2009. "New Frontiers in the Economics of Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 295-306, July.
  2. Carlo Bollino & Silvia Micheli, 2012. "On the Relative Optimality of Environmental Policy Instruments: An Application of the Work of Alberto Alesina," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 40(4), pages 385-399, December.
  3. Pauline Barrieu & Bernard Sinclair Desgagne, 2009. "Economic policy when models disagree," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37607, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Gary D. Libecap, 2013. "Addressing Global Environmental Externalities: Transaction Costs Considerations," NBER Working Papers 19501, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Robert Falkner & Hannes Stephan & John Vogler, 2010. "International climate policy after Copenhagen: towards a ‘building blocks’ approach," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers 21, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  6. David J. Frame & Cameron J. Hepburn, 2011. "Emerging markets and climate change: Mexican standoff or low-carbon race?," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers 46, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  7. Pauline Barrieu & Sinclair Desgagné, 2009. "Economic policy when models disagree," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers 4, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  8. Legge, Thomas & Scott, Susan, 2009. "Policy Options to Reduce Ireland's GHG Emissions [Instrument choice: the pros and cons of alternative policy instruments]," Papers WP284, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  9. Steve Suranovic, 2011. "Addicted to Oil: Implications for Climate Change Policy," Working Papers 2011-22, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  10. Legge, Thomas & Scott, Susan, 2009. "Policy Options to Reduce Ireland's Greenhouse Gas Emissions," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS9.
  11. Liu, Antung Anthony, 2012. "Tax Evasion and Optimal Environmental Taxes," Discussion Papers dp-12-37, Resources For the Future.

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