Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Modeling fresh organic produce consumption with scanner data: a generalized double hurdle model approach

Contents:

Author Info

  • Feng Zhang

    (Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7509 and Deloitte Consulting LLP, 111 S. Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60025)

  • Chung L. Huang

    (Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Georgia, 313-E Conner Hall, Athens, GA 30602-7509)

  • Biing-Hwan Lin

    (Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room N2110, 1800 M Street NW, Washington, DC 20036-5831)

  • James E. Epperson

    (Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Georgia, 315 Conner Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7509)

Abstract

Previous studies using consumer surveys based on contingent valuations gave inconsistent or even contradictory results with respect to the impact of some consumer characteristics on organic foods consumption. Using actual retail-level data, this study provides an objective view of the consumers' social economic characteristics related to the growth of the fresh organic produce market with a generalized double hurdle model. Market participation and conditional|unconditional consumption elasticities were computed for the generalized double hurdle model. [EconLit citations: C240, D120, Q110]. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/agr.20176
File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Agribusiness.

Volume (Year): 24 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 510-522

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:24:y:2008:i:4:p:510-522

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-6297

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-44, September.
  2. Steven Yen, 2005. "Zero observations and gender differences in cigarette consumption," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(16), pages 1839-1849.
  3. Gary D. Thompson, 1998. "Consumer Demand for Organic Foods: What We Know and What We Need to Know," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(5), pages 1113-1118.
  4. Blisard, Noel & Stewart, Hayden & Jolliffe, Dean, 2004. "Low-Income Households' Expenditures On Fruits And Vegetables," Agricultural Economics Reports 34041, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  5. Carol Newman & Maeve Henchion & Alan Matthews, 2003. "A double-hurdle model of Irish household expenditure on prepared meals," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(9), pages 1053-1061.
  6. Jolly, Desmond A., 1991. "Differences Between Buyers and Nonbuyers of Organic Produce and Willingness to Pay Organic Price Premiums," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 9(1).
  7. Wagner, Janet & Hanna, Sherman, 1983. " The Effectiveness of Family Life Cycle Variables in Consumer Expenditure Research," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(3), pages 281-91, December.
  8. Amemiya, Takeshi & Boskin, Michael J, 1974. "Regression Analysis when the Dependent Variable is Truncated Lognormal, with an Application to the Determinants of the Duration of Welfare Dependency," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 15(2), pages 485-96, June.
  9. Steven T. Yen & Andrew M. Jones, 1997. "Household Consumption of Cheese: An Inverse Hyperbolic Sine Double-Hurdle Model with Dependent Errors," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 246-251.
  10. Diansheng Dong & Chanjin Chung & Harry Kaiser, 2004. "Modelling milk purchasing behaviour with a panel data double-hurdle model," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(8), pages 769-779.
  11. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  12. Huang, Chung L, 1996. "Consumer Preferences and Attitudes towards Organically Grown Produce," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 331-42.
  13. Dimitri, Carolyn & Greene, Catherine R., 2002. "Recent Growth Patterns In The U.S. Organic Foods Market," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33715, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  14. Helen H. Jensen & Steven T. Yen, 1995. "U.S. Food Expenditures Away From Home by Type of Meal," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 95-wp143, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  15. Jones, Andrew M, 1989. "A Double-Hurdle Model of Cigarette Consumption," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 4(1), pages 23-39, Jan.-Mar..
  16. Newhouse, Joseph P, 1987. "Health Economics and Econometrics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 269-74, May.
  17. Lin, Tsai-Fen & Schmidt, Peter, 1984. "A Test of the Tobit Specification against an Alternative Suggested by Cragg," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(1), pages 174-77, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Erica Herpen & Erjen Nierop & Laurens Sloot, 2012. "The relationship between in-store marketing and observed sales for organic versus fair trade products," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 293-308, March.
  2. Campbell, Benjamin L. & Khachatryan, Hayk & Behe, Bridget K. & Dennis, Jennifer & Hall, Charles, 2014. "U.S. and Canadian Consumer Perception of Local and Organic Terminology," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 17(2).
  3. Costanigro, Marco & Kroll, Stephan & Thilmany, Dawn D., 2012. "Local, Organic, Conventional— Asymmetric Effects of Information and Taste on Label Preferences in an Experimental Auction," 2012 AAEA/EAAE Food Environment Symposium, May 30-31, Boston, MA 123199, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Schrock, Rebecca, 2010. "Determinants Of The Demand For Organic And Conventional Fresh Milk In Germany– An Econometric Analysis," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116387, European Association of Agricultural Economists;Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  5. Schroeck, Rebecca, 2011. "A Demand System Analysis of Organic and Conventional Fresh Milk in Germany Segmented by Consumer Groups," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 115995, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:24:y:2008:i:4:p:510-522. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.