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Experimentation and Job Choice

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  • Kate Antonovics
  • Limor Golan

Abstract

In this article, we examine optimal job choices when jobs differ in the rate at which they reveal information about workers’ skills. We then analyze how the optimal level of experimentation changes over a worker’s career and characterize job transitions and wage growth over the life cycle. Using the Dictionary of Occupational Titles merged with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we then construct an index of how much information different occupations reveal about workers’ skills and document patterns of occupational choice and wage growth that are consistent with a trade-off between information and wages.

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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/663356
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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/663356
Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 333 - 366

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/663356

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. Theodore Papageorgiou, 2009. "Learning Your Comparative Advantages," 2009 Meeting Papers 1150, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Jonathan James, 2011. "Ability matching and occupational choice," Working Paper 1125, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  3. Carl Sanders, 2012. "Skill Uncertainty, Skill Accumulation, and Occupational Choice," 2012 Meeting Papers 633, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Theodore Papageorgiou, 2010. "Large Firms and Internal Labor Markets," 2010 Meeting Papers 1216, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. Stefanie Brilon, 2010. "Job Assignment with Multivariate Skills," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2010_25, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
  6. Jonathan James, 2012. "Learning and occupational sorting," Working Paper 1225, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

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