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Does Education Reduce the Risk of Hypertension? Estimating the Biomarker Effect of Compulsory Schooling in England

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  • Nattavudh Powdthavee

Abstract

This paper estimates the exogenous effect of schooling on reducedincidence of hypertension. Using the changes in the minimum school-leavingage law in the United Kingdom from age 14 to 15 in 1947 and from age15 to 16 in 1973 as sources of exogenous variation in schooling, theregression discontinuity and instrumental variable probit estimatesimply that, for the first law change in 1947, completing an extrayear of schooling reduces the probability of developing subsequenthypertension by approximately 7-10 percentage points. No significanteffect was found for the introduction of the second law change in1973. (c) 2010 by The University of Chicago. Allrights reserved..

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Human Capital.

Volume (Year): 4 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 173-202

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:v:4:y:2010:i:2:p:173-202

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Cited by:
  1. Jinhu Li & Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2014. "Does Increasing Schooling Improve Later Health Habits? Evidence from the School Reforms in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Giorgio Brunello & Margherita Fort & Nichole Schneeweis & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2011. "The Causal Effect of Education on Health: What is the Role of Health Behaviors?," NRN working papers 2011-17, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria, revised Nov 2011.
  3. Hendrik Jürges & Eberhard Kruk & Steffen Reinhold, 2010. "The Effect of Compulsory Schooling on Health - Evidence from Biomarkers," CESifo Working Paper Series 3105, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Raquel Fonseca & Yuhui Zheng, 2013. "The Effect of Education on Health: Cross-Country Evidence," Cahiers de recherche 1325, CIRPEE.
  5. Hart, Robert A & Moro, Mirko & Roberts, J Elizabeth, 2012. "Date of birth, family background, and the 11 plus exam: short- and long-term consequences of the 1944 secondary education reforms in England and W ales," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2012-10, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  6. Gibson, John & Stillman, Steven & McKenzie, David & Rohorua, Halahingano, 2010. "Natural Experiment Evidence on the Effect of Migration on Blood Pressure and Hypertension," IZA Discussion Papers 5232, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Kemptner, Daniel & Jürges, Hendrik & Reinhold, Steffen, 2011. "Changes in compulsory schooling and the causal effect of education on health: Evidence from Germany," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 340-354, March.
  8. Eide, Eric R. & Showalter, Mark H., 2011. "Estimating the relation between health and education: What do we know and what do we need to know?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 778-791, October.
  9. Petter Lundborg, 2013. "The health returns to schooling—what can we learn from twins?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 673-701, April.
  10. Brunello, Giorgio & Fort, Margherita & Schneeweis, Nicole & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2011. "The Causal Effect of Education on Health," Economics Series 280, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  11. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & Adireksombat, Kampon, 2010. "From Classroom to Wedding Aisle: The Effect of a Nationwide Change in the Compulsory Schooling Law on Age at First Marriage in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 5019, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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