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Insider trading and portfolio structure in experimental asset markets with a long-lived asset

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  • J. P. Krahnen
  • C. Rieck
  • E. Theissen

Abstract

Results are reported of a series of nine market experiments with asymmetric information and a fundamental value process that is more 'realistic' than those in previous experiments. Both a call market institution and a continuous double auction mechanism are employed. Considerable pricing inefficiencies that are only partially exploited by insiders were found. The magnitude of insider gains is analysed separately for each experiment. Support is found for the hypothesis that the continuous double auction leads to more efficient outcomes. Finally, evidence of an endowment effect is presented: the initial portfolio structure influences the final asset holdings of experimental subjects.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The European Journal of Finance.

Volume (Year): 5 (1999)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 29-50

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Handle: RePEc:taf:eurjfi:v:5:y:1999:i:1:p:29-50

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Related research

Keywords: Experimental Asset Markets; Market Efficiency; Market Institutions; Endowment Effect;

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References

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  1. Plott, Charles R. & Sunder, Shyam., . "Efficiency of Experimental Security Markets with Insider Information: An Application of Rational Expectations Models," Working Papers 331, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  2. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
  3. Schnitzlein, Charles R, 1996. " Call and Continuous Trading Mechanisms under Asymmetric Information: An Experimental Investigation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(2), pages 613-36, June.
  4. Kahneman, Daniel & Knetsch, Jack L & Thaler, Richard H, 1990. "Experimental Tests of the Endowment Effect and the Coase Theorem," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(6), pages 1325-48, December.
  5. Smith, Vernon L, et al, 1982. "Competitive Market Institutions: Double Auctions vs. Sealed Bid-Offer Auctions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 58-77, March.
  6. Jan Pieter Krahnen & Martin Weber, 2001. "Marketmaking in the Laboratory: Does Competition Matter?," Working Paper Series: Finance and Accounting 4, Department of Finance, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main.
  7. De Long, J. Bradford & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H. & Waldmann, Robert J., 1990. "Noise Trader Risk in Financial Markets," Scholarly Articles 3725552, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  8. De Long, J. Bradford & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H. & Waldmann, Robert J., 1991. "The Survival of Noise Traders in Financial Markets," Scholarly Articles 3725470, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. Holden, Craig W & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1992. " Long-Lived Private Information and Imperfect Competition," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(1), pages 247-70, March.
  10. Sunder, S., 1992. "Lower Bounds for Efficiency of Surplus Extraction in Double Auctions," GSIA Working Papers 1992-17, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  11. Gode, D.K. & Sunder, S., 1991. "Allocative Efficiency of Markets with Zero Intelligence (Z1) Traders: Market as a Partial Substitute for Individual Rationality," GSIA Working Papers 1992-16, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  12. Van Boening, Mark V. & Williams, Arlington W. & LaMaster, Shawn, 1993. "Price bubbles and crashes in experimental call markets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 179-185.
  13. Friedman, Daniel, 1993. "How Trading Institutions Affect Financial Market Performance: Some Laboratory Evidence," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(3), pages 410-35, July.
  14. Krahnen, Jan Pieter & Rieck, Christian & Theissen, Erik, 1997. "Inferring risk attitudes from certainty equivalents: Some lessons from an experimental study," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 469-486, September.
  15. Smith, Vernon L & Suchanek, Gerry L & Williams, Arlington W, 1988. "Bubbles, Crashes, and Endogenous Expectations in Experimental Spot Asset Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(5), pages 1119-51, September.
  16. Gode, Dhananjay K & Sunder, Shyam, 1993. "Allocative Efficiency of Markets with Zero-Intelligence Traders: Market as a Partial Substitute for Individual Rationality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 119-37, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. J├╝rgen Huber & Matthias Sutter & Michael Kirchler, 2004. "Is more information always better? Experimental financial markets with asymmetric information," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2005-13, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
  2. Kirchler, Michael & Huber, Jurgen, 2007. "Fat tails and volatility clustering in experimental asset markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1844-1874, June.
  3. Dennis Dittrich & Boris Maciejovsky, . "Information Dissemination on Asset Markets with Endogenous and Exogenous Information: An Experimental Approacha," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2002-03, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
  4. Huber, Jurgen & Kirchler, Michael & Sutter, Matthias, 2008. "Is more information always better: Experimental financial markets with cumulative information," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 86-104, January.

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