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Part-time jobs: what women want?

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  • Alison Booth

    ()

  • Jan Ours

    ()

Abstract

Part-time jobs are common among partnered women in many countries. There are two opposing views on the efficiency implications of so many women working part-time. The negative view is that part-time jobs imply wastage of resources and underutilization of investments in human capital since many part-time working women are highly educated. The positive view is that, without the existence of part-time jobs, female labor force participation would be substantially lower since women confronted with the choice between a full-time job and zero working hours would opt for the latter. In the Netherlands, the majority of partnered working women have a part-time job. Our paper investigates, from a supply-side perspective, if the current situation of abundant part-time work in the Netherlands is likely to be a transitional phase that will culminate in many women working full-time. Our main results indicate that partnered women in part-time work have high levels of job satisfaction, a low desire to change their working hours, and live in partnerships in which household production is highly gendered. Taken together, our results suggest that part-time jobs are what most Dutch women want. Copyright The Author(s) 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-012-0417-9
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 26 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 263-283

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:26:y:2013:i:1:p:263-283

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Related research

Keywords: Part-time work; Happiness; Satisfaction; Working hours; Gender; J22; I31; J16;

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References

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  1. Clark, A.E., 1995. "Job Satisfaction and Gender: Why Are Women so Happy at Work?," DELTA Working Papers 95-10, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  2. Blank, Rebecca M, 1989. "The Role of Part-Time Work in Women's Labor Market Choices over Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 295-99, May.
  3. Nicole Bosch & B. van der Klaauw, 2010. "Analyzing female labor supply: Evidence from a Dutch tax reform," CPB Discussion Paper 155, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  4. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2007. "Moving Down: Women`s Part-time Work and Occupational Change in Britain 1991-2001," Economics Series Working Papers 359, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Alison Booth & Jan van Ours, 2005. "Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part-time Work Make the Family Happier?," CEPR Discussion Papers 507, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  6. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2002. "How important is Methodology for the Estimates of the Determinants of Happiness?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-024/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  7. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2001. "What Can Economists Learn from Happiness Research?," CESifo Working Paper Series 503, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. Booth, Alison L. & van Ours, Jan C., 2007. "Job Satisfaction and Family Happiness: The Part-time Work Puzzle," IZA Discussion Papers 3020, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Manning, Alan & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2007. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain," CEPR Discussion Papers 6058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Johannes Schwarze & Rainer Winkelmann, 2011. "Happiness and altruism within the extended family," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 1033-1051, July.
  11. Nicole Bosch & Anja Deelen & Rob Euwals, 2010. "Is Part-time Employment Here to Stay? Working Hours of Dutch Women over Successive Generations," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(1), pages 35-54, 03.
  12. Booth, A.L. & Coles, M.G., 2010. "Tax policy and returns to education," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 291-301, January.
  13. Rosen, Sherwin, 1983. "Specialization and Human Capital," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 43-49, January.
  14. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics And Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Elsayed A.E.A. & Fouarge D. & Grip A. de, 2014. "Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK," Research Memorandum 011, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
  2. Bart Loog & Thomas Dohmen & Maarten Vendrik, 2013. "The Scope for Increasing Total Hours Worked," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(2), pages 157-174, June.
  3. Beja, Jr., Edsel, 2012. "Who is happier: The housewife or working wife?," MPRA Paper 37551, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Ragni Hege Kitterød & Marit Rønsen & AneSeierstad, 2011. "Mobilising female labour market reserves: What promotes women’s transitions from part-time to full-time work?," Discussion Papers 658, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  5. Colella, Fabrizio, 2014. "Women's Part-Time - Full-Time Wage Differentials in Europe: an Endogenous Switching Model," MPRA Paper 55287, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Jeroen Horemans & Ive Marx, 2013. "In-work poverty in times of crisis: do part-timers fare worse?," ImPRovE Working Papers 13/14, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
  7. World Bank, 2011. "Work and Family : Latin American and Caribbean Women in Search of a New Balance," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12489, The World Bank.

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