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Democracy, populism and hyperinflation: some evidence from Latin America

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  • Manoel Bittencourt

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Abstract

In this paper we test for the populist view of inflation in South America during the eventful period between 1970 and 2007, a period which captures the latest democratic transition in the continent, episodes of hyperinflation and finally macroeconomic stabilisation. The results—based on panel time-series data and analysis—confirm the prediction which suggests that recently elected governments coming into power after periods of political dictatorship, and which are faced with demand for redistribution, end up engaging in populist (or redistributive) policies, which tend to lead to high inflation and overall poor macroeconomic performance. All in all, we suggest that the implementation of democracy as such requires not only the “right political context”—or an appropriately constrained executive—to work well, but it also must come with certain economic institutions (central bank independence and a credible and responsible fiscal authority), institutions that were (coincidentally) absent in South America right after re-democratisation, but which would presumably raise the costs of pursuing populist policies in the first place. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Economics of Governance.

Volume (Year): 13 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 311-332

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Handle: RePEc:spr:ecogov:v:13:y:2012:i:4:p:311-332

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Related research

Keywords: Democracy; Populism; Hyperinflation; Latin America; E31; E65; N16; O23; O54;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Manoel Bittencourt, 2010. "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Latin America: Schumpeter is Right!," Working Papers 201014, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  2. Manoel Bittencourt, 2010. "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Latin America: Is Schumpeter Right?," Working Papers 191, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  3. Manoel Bittencourt, 2011. "Is Copacabana Still the ‘Little Princess of the Sea’?," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(1), pages 11-16, 03.
  4. Manoel Bittencourt, 2010. "Inflation and Economic Growth in Latin America: Some Panel Time-Series Evidence," Working Papers 201011, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  5. Manoel Bittencourt, 2013. "Democracy and Education: Evidence from the Southern African Development Community," Working Papers 201387, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  6. Bittencourt, Manoel, 2012. "Inflación y crecimiento económico: Evidencia con datos de panel para América del Sur," Revista Estudios Económicos, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú, issue 23, pages 25-38.

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