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Gender Differences in Demand for Schooling

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Author Info

  • Shahnaz Hamid

    (Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad.)

  • Rehana Siddiqui

    (Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad.)

Abstract

The comparison of human development indicators in Table 1 shows that Pakistan’s performance is below the average for South Asian countries and below the average for the developing countries. Furthermore, gender differences in human development are also significant within country and across countries. For example, in 1999, differences in male and female literacy rate was 24 points in Pakistan, higher then the difference in less developed countries (equalling 15 points). [See HDC (2001)]. Similarly, within Pakistan, male literacy rate increased from 35 percent in 1980-81 to 56.6 percent in 1998-99 whereas female literacy rate increased from 16 percent in 1980-81 to 32.6 percent in 1998-99. This shows that despite doubling of female literacy rate, the gap between male and female literacy rate widened from 19 percent in 1980-81 to 24 percent in 1998-99. Similarly, another indicator of human capital, i.e., the net enrolment rates at primary level exhibited a declining trend in 1990s, particularly among males. An important reason for the decline could be rise in poverty. Table 2 shows a sustained increase in net enrolment ratio with income, and the positive income effect is higher in urban areas. In rural areas, the enrolment rate increases with income but there is slight decline in female enrolment rate at the highest income level. Thus, despite rapid rise in female enrolment the gender, differences persist and income is the main factor affecting demand for education.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Pakistan Institute of Development Economics in its journal The Pakistan Development Review.

Volume (Year): 40 (2001)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 1077-1092

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Handle: RePEc:pid:journl:v:40:y:2001:i:4:p:1077-1092

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  1. Glick, Peter & Sahn, David E., 1999. "Schooling of girls and boys in a West African country: the effects of parental education, income, and household structure," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 63-87, February.
  2. Richard H. Sabot, 1992. "Human Capital Accumulation in Post Green Revolution Rural Pakistan: A Progress Report," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 31(4), pages 449-490.
  3. Zeba A. Sathar & Cynthia B. Lloyd, 1994. "Who Gets Primary Schooling in Pakistan: Inequalities among and within Families," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 33(2), pages 103-134.
  4. G. M. Arif & Najam US Saqib & G. M. Zahid, 1999. "Poverty, Gender, and Primary School Enrolment in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 979-992.
  5. Shahnaz Hamid, 1991. "Determinants of the Supply of Women in the Labour Market: A Micro Analysis," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 30(4), pages 755-766.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Muhammad Sabir, 2002. "Gender and Public Spending on Education in Pakistan: A Case Study of Disaggregated Benefit Incidence," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 41(4), pages 477-493.
  2. Naushin Mahmood, 2009. "Population and Development Demographic Research at PIDE," PIDE Books, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, number 2009:1 edited by Rashid Amjad & Aurangzeb A. Hashmi, September.
  3. Toseef Azid & Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2010. "Who are the children going to school in Urban Punjab (Pakistan)?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(6), pages 442-465, May.

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