Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Climate Change, Agriculture, and Developing Countries: Does Adaptation Matter?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Mendelsohn, Robert
  • Dinar, Ariel

Abstract

Because most developing countries depend heavily on agriculture, the effects of global warming on productive croplands are likely to threaten both the welfare of the population and the economic development of the countries. Tropical regions in the developing world are particularly vulnerable to potential damage from environmental changes because the poor soils that cover large areas of these regions already have made much of the land unusable for agriculture. Although agronomic simulation models predict that higher temperatures will reduce grain yields as the cool wheat-growing areas get warmer, they have not examined the possibility that farmers will adapt by making production decisions that are in their own best interests. A recent set of models examines cross-sectional evidence from India and Brazil and finds that even though the agricultural sector is sensitive to climate, individual farmers do take local climates into account, and their ability to do so will help mitigate the impacts of global warming. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.worldbank.org/research/journals/wbro/obsaug99/article6.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal World Bank Research Observer.

Volume (Year): 14 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 (August)
Pages: 277-93

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:14:y:1999:i:2:p:277-93

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK
Phone: (202) 477-1234
Fax: 01865 267 985
Email:
Web page: http://wbro.oxfordjournals.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Cline, William R, 1996. "The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1309-11, December.
  2. H. El-Shaer & C. Rosenzweig & A. Iglesias & M. Eid & D. Hillel, 1997. "Impact of climate change on possible scenarios for Egyptian agriculture in the future," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 233-250, September.
  3. Beach, Robert H. & Thomson, Allison M. & McCarl, Bruce A., 2010. "Climate Change Impacts On Us Agriculture," Proceedings Issues, 2010: Climate Change in World Agriculture: Mitigation, Adaptation, Trade and Food Security, June 2010, Stuttgart- Hohenheim, Germany 91393, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  4. Mendelsohn, Robert & Nordhaus, William D & Shaw, Daigee, 1994. "The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A Ricardian Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 753-71, September.
  5. Tol, Richard S. J., 2011. "The Social Cost of Carbon," Papers WP377, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  6. Jan Lewandrowski & David Schimmelpfennig, 1999. "Economic Implications of Climate Change for U.S. Agriculture: Assessing Recent Evidence," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(1), pages 39-57.
  7. Dinar, A. & Mendelsohn, R. & Evenson, R. & Parikh, J. & Sanghi, A. & Kumar, K. & McKinsey, J. & Lonergen, S., 1998. "Measuring the Impact of CLimate Change on Indian Agriculture," Papers 402, World Bank - Technical Papers.
  8. Dinar, Ariel & Zilberman, David, 1991. "The economics of resource-conservation, pollution-reduction technology selection: The case of irrigation water," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 323-348, December.
  9. Ariel Dinar & Mark Campbell & David Zilberman, 1992. "Adoption of improved irrigation and drainage reduction technologies under limiting environmental conditions," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(4), pages 373-398, July.
  10. Grepperud, Sverre, 1997. "Poverty, Land Degradation and Climatic Uncertainty," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(4), pages 586-608, October.
  11. Mendelsohn, Robert & Nordhaus, William, 1996. "The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1312-15, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
  1. > Environmental and Natural Resource Economics > Climate economics > Adaptation
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. David Zilberman & Xuemei Liu & David Roland-Holst & David Sunding, 2004. "The economics of climate change in agriculture," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 365-382, October.
  2. Wang, Jinxia & Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel & Huang, Jikun, 2009. "How China’S Farmers Adapt To Climate Change?," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51803, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Barrios, Salvador & Ouattara, Bazoumanna & Strobl, Eric, 2004. "The Impact of Climatic Change on Agricultural Production: Is it different for Africa?," MPRA Paper 6240, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Sebastian Kopf & Minh Ha-Duong & Stéphane Hallegatte, 2008. "Using Maps of City Analogues to Display and Interpret Climate Change scenarios and their uncertainty," Working Papers hal-00866436, HAL.
  5. Charles Nhemachena & Rashid Hassan & Pradeep Kurukulasuriya, 2010. "Measuring The Economic Impact Of Climate Change On African Agricultural Production Systems," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 1(01), pages 33-55.
  6. Wang, Jinxia & Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott & Zhang, Lijuan, 2008. "Can China continue feeding itself ? the impact of climate change on agriculture," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4470, The World Bank.
  7. Naeem Akram, 2012. "Is climate change hindering economic growth of Asian economies?," Asia Pacific Trade and Investment Review, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 19(2), pages 1-18, December.
  8. S. Prabhakar & Ancha Srinivasan & Rajib Shaw, 2009. "Climate change and local level disaster risk reduction planning: need, opportunities and challenges," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 7-33, January.
  9. Fan Zhai & Juzhong Zhuang, 2009. "Agricultural Impact of Climate Change: A General Equilibrium Analysis with Special Reference to Southeast Asia," Working Papers id:1944, eSocialSciences.
  10. W.Neil Adger, 2001. "Scales of governance and environmental justice for adaptation and mitigation of climate change," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 921-931.
  11. Valdes, Constanza & Arriola, Christine & Somwaru, Agapi & Gasques, Jose Garcia, 2010. "Brazil’S Climate Adaptation Policies: Impacts On Agriculture," Proceedings Issues, 2010: Climate Change in World Agriculture: Mitigation, Adaptation, Trade and Food Security, June 2010, Stuttgart- Hohenheim, Germany 91420, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  12. Mendelsohn, Robert & Seo, Sungno Niggol, 2007. "Climate change impacts on animal husbandry in Africa : a Ricardian analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4261, The World Bank.
  13. Toman, Michael & Kolstad, Charles, 2000. "The Economics of Climate Policy," Discussion Papers dp-00-40, Resources For the Future.
  14. Charles, Michael B. & Ryan, Rachel & Oloruntoba, Richard & Heidt, Tania von der & Ryan, Neal, 2009. "The EU-Africa Energy Partnership: Towards a mutually beneficial renewable transport energy alliance?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5546-5556, December.
  15. Gaasland, Ivar, 2005. "Can a Warmer Climate Save Northern Agriculture?," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24551, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  16. Pytrik Reidsma & Alfons Oude Lansink & Frank Ewert, 2009. "Economic impacts of climatic variability and subsidies on European agriculture and observed adaptation strategies," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 35-59, January.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:14:y:1999:i:2:p:277-93. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.