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Coaching Team Production

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Author Info

  • Clement, Robert C
  • McCormick, Robert E

Abstract

The actual function of managers is the subject of much debate. Using data on more than 3,000 male college basketball players, their coaches, and their skill levels, the authors find a positive and significant relation between the ability to replicate an individual coach's allocation of playing time across players and his winning percentage. The results do support the property rights paradigm: managers are the employees of workers; and more generally, sports data can be used to help understand related economic processes where quantifiable measures of inputs and outputs are more costly to obtain. Copyright 1989 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 27 (1989)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 287-304

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:27:y:1989:i:2:p:287-304

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. McCormick, Robert E. & Tollison, Robert D., 2001. "Why do black basketball players work more for less money?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 201-219, February.
  2. Lehmann, Erik & Weigand, Jürgen, 1997. "Fußball als ökonomisches Phänomen: Money Makes the Ball Go Round," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 08, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
  3. Richard A. Hofler & James E. Payne, 2006. "Efficiency in the National Basketball Association: a stochastic frontier approach with panel data," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 279-285.
  4. Peter Dawson & Stephen Dobson, 2009. "The Influence of Social Pressure and Nationality on Individual Decisions: Evidence from the Behaviour of Referees," NCER Working Paper Series 46, National Centre for Econometric Research.
  5. Lawrence Hadley & Marc Poitras & John Ruggiero & Scott Knowles, 2000. "Performance evaluation of National Football League teams," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 63-70.
  6. Mirabile, McDonald & Witte, Mark, 2012. "Can schools buy success in college football? Coach compensation, expenditures and performance," MPRA Paper 40642, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Berri, David J. & Schmidt, Martin B., 2002. "Instrumental versus bounded rationality: a comparison of Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 191-214.
  8. Fiona Carmichael & Dennis Thomas & Robert Ward, 2000. "Team performance: the case of English Premiership football," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 31-45.
  9. Dieter J. Haas, 2003. "Productive efficiency of English football teams-a data envelopment analysis approach," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(5), pages 403-410.
  10. Thomas H. Bruggink, 1993. "National Pastime to Dismal Science: Using Baseball to Illustrate Economic Principles," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 19(3), pages 275-294, Summer.
  11. Brian L. Goff & Robert E. McCormick & Robert D. Tollison, 2002. "Racial Integration as an Innovation: Empirical Evidence from Sports Leagues," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 16-26, March.

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