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To be or not to be trusted: The influence of media richness on defection and deception

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  • Rockmann, Kevin W.
  • Northcraft, Gregory B.
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    Abstract

    When business transactions take place between strangers, individuals rely on the cues during communication to determine whether they can trust others' intentions. How that process occurs in the context of computer-mediated, video-mediated, and face-to-face interactions is still somewhat unknown. We examine how media richness influences both affective-based and cognitive-based trust in the context of two studies with two different social dilemma scenarios. Further, we explore how these two types of trust influence not only non-cooperative behavior (defection) but also lying (deception). Results from the first study suggest cognitive-based trust mediates the relationship between media richness and defection, while results from both studies suggest that affective-based trust mediates the relationship between media richness and deception. Video-mediated communication solves some, but not all, of the problems inherent when interacting via communication technology.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WP2-4S9R1X0-1/2/d80d1c664ccb2480cc7a82fae7acbbd5
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 107 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (November)
    Pages: 106-122

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:107:y:2008:i:2:p:106-122

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

    Related research

    Keywords: Media richness Cooperation Deception Trust Social dilemma Computer-mediated communication Virtual team;

    References

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    1. Wilson, Jeanne M. & Straus, Susan G. & McEvily, Bill, 2006. "All in due time: The development of trust in computer-mediated and face-to-face teams," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 16-33, January.
    2. Richard L. Daft & Robert H. Lengel, 1986. "Organizational Information Requirements, Media Richness and Structural Design," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 32(5), pages 554-571, May.
    3. Valley, Kathleen L. & Moag, Joseph & Bazerman, Max H., 1998. "'A matter of trust':: Effects of communication on the efficiency and distribution of outcomes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 211-238, February.
    4. Wade-Benzoni, Kimberly A. & Tenbrunsel, Ann E. & Bazerman, Max H., 1996. "Egocentric Interpretations of Fairness in Asymmetric, Environmental Social Dilemmas: Explaining Harvesting Behavior and the Role of Communication," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 111-126, August.
    5. Bhappu, Anita D. & Griffith, Terri L. & Northcraft, Gregory B., 1997. "Media Effects and Communication Bias in Diverse Groups," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 199-205, June.
    6. Baltes, Boris B. & Dickson, Marcus W. & Sherman, Michael P. & Bauer, Cara C. & LaGanke, Jacqueline S., 2002. "Computer-Mediated Communication and Group Decision Making: A Meta-Analysis," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 156-179, January.
    7. Alge, Bradley J. & Wiethoff, Carolyn & Klein, Howard J., 2003. "When does the medium matter? Knowledge-building experiences and opportunities in decision-making teams," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 26-37, May.
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    Cited by:
    1. McCarter, Matthew W. & Budescu, David V. & Scheffran, J├╝rgen, 2011. "The give-or-take-some dilemma: An empirical investigation of a hybrid social dilemma," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 116(1), pages 83-95, September.

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