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The international transmission of monetary shocks across developed countries: The role of imported raw materials

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  • Garcia-Cebro, Juan A.
  • Varela-Santamaría, Ramón
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    Abstract

    This paper analyzes the implications of a production technology in developed countries (DC) characterized by the share of imported raw materials coming from the less developed countries (LDC). We focus on the question of how this richer productive structure affects the international transmission of a monetary shock across developed countries. In this context, it is shown that (i) the share of raw materials and/or its low substitutability is a source of exchange rate volatility. (ii) Welfare transmission depends critically on the extent of their share in production. (iii) Sufficiently high shares of imported raw materials in the DC production functions explain better positive co-movements between DC outputs.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of International Money and Finance.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 8 ()
    Pages: 1791-1813

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:30:y:2011:i:8:p:1791-1813

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30443

    Related research

    Keywords: Monetary shocks; Exchange rates; Raw materials;

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