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Currency crashes and bond yields in industrial countries

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  • Gagnon, Joseph E.

Abstract

This paper examines episodes of sudden large exchange rate depreciations (currency crashes) in industrial countries and characterizes the behavior of government bond yields during and after these crashes. The most important determinant of changes in bond yields appears to be inflationary expectations. When inflation is high and rising at the time of a currency crash, bond yields tend to rise. Otherwise--and in every currency crash since 1985--bond yields tend to fall. Over the past 20 years, inflation rates have been remarkably stable in industrial countries after currency crashes.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of International Money and Finance.

Volume (Year): 28 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 161-181

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:28:y:2009:i:1:p:161-181

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30443

Related research

Keywords: Exchange rate Depreciation Interest rate Inflation;

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References

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  2. Gian Maria Milesi Ferretti & Assaf Razin, 2000. "Current Account Reversals and Currency Crises: Empirical Regularities," NBER Chapters, in: Currency Crises, pages 285-323 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  6. Tudela, Merxe, 2004. "Explaining currency crises: a duration model approach," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 799-816, September.
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  9. Engel, Charles & Rogers, John H. & Rose, Andrew K., 2003. "Empirical exchange rate models," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 1-2, May.
  10. Joseph E. Gagnon & Jane Ihrig, 2004. "Monetary policy and exchange rate pass-through This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 315-338.
  11. Neil R. Ericsson & James G. MacKinnon, 2002. "Distributions of error correction tests for cointegration," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 5(2), pages 285-318, 06.
  12. Joseph E. Gagnon, 1997. "Inflation Regimes and Inflation Expectations," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp9701, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  13. Pinelopi K. Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1996. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," NBER Working Papers 5862, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  16. Joseph E. Gagnon & Jane Ihrig, 2001. "Monetary policy and exchange rate pass-through," International Finance Discussion Papers 704, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. David Hargreaves & Elizabeth Watson, 2011. "Sudden stops, external debt and the exchange rate," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 74, pages 1-11, December.
  2. Barry Eichengreen, 2009. "The Blind Men and the Elephant," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(53-54), pages 25-57, January -.
  3. Carol C. Bertaut & Steven B. Kamin & Charles P. Thomas, 2008. "How long can the unsustainable U.S. current account deficit be sustained?," International Finance Discussion Papers 935, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Barry Eichengreen, 2005. "Commentary : the end of large current account deficits : 1970-2002 : are there lessons for the United States?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Aug, pages 269-276.
  5. Sebastian Edwards, 2005. "The end of large current account deficits : 1970-2002 : are there lessons for the United States?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Aug, pages 205-268.
  6. Barry Eichengreen, 2007. "Insurance Underwriter or Financial Development Fund: What Role for Reserve Pooling in Latin America?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 27-52, February.
  7. Mehl, Arnaud & Cappiello, Lorenzo, 2007. "Uncovered interest parity at distant horizons: evidence on emerging economies & nonlinearities," Working Paper Series 0801, European Central Bank.
  8. Francis E. Warnock, 2006. "How Might a Disorderly Resolution of Global Imbalances Affect Global Wealth?," IMF Working Papers 06/170, International Monetary Fund.

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