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Striking oil: Another puzzle?

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  • Driesprong, Gerben
  • Jacobsen, Ben
  • Maat, Benjamin
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    Abstract

    Changes in oil prices predict stock market returns worldwide. We find significant predictability in both developed and emerging markets. These results cannot be explained by time-varying risk premia as oil price changes also significantly predict negative excess returns. Investors seem to underreact to information in the price of oil. A rise in oil prices drastically lowers future stock returns. Consistent with the hypothesis of a delayed reaction by investors, the relation between monthly stock returns and lagged monthly oil price changes strengthens once we introduce lags of several trading days between monthly stock returns and lagged monthly oil price changes.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VBX-4SVKSVK-1/2/26a285a17d793a72ae5a5dee67446cb3
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Financial Economics.

    Volume (Year): 89 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (August)
    Pages: 307-327

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:89:y:2008:i:2:p:307-327

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505576

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