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Money and liquidity effects: Separating demand from supply

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  • Chadha, Jagjit S.
  • Corrado, Luisa
  • Sun, Qi

Abstract

In the canonical monetary policy model, money is endogenous to the optimal path for interest rates and output. But when liquidity provision by banks dominates the demand for transactions money from the real economy, money is likely to contain information for future output because of its impact on financial spreads. And so we decompose broad money into primitive demand and supply shocks. We find that supply shocks have played a significant role in the time series in each of the USA, UK and Eurozone in the short to medium term. We further consider to what extent the supply of broad money is related to policy or to liquidity effects from financial intermediation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Volume (Year): 34 (2010)
Issue (Month): 9 (September)
Pages: 1732-1747

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Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:34:y:2010:i:9:p:1732-1747

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Keywords: Money Liquidity Bayesian VAR identification Sign restrictions;

References

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Cited by:
  1. Hyun Jeong Kim & Hyun Song Shin & Jacho Yun, 2013. "Monetary Aggregates and the Central Bank’s Financial Stability Mandate Money is the balance sheet counterpart to bank lending. As such, highly procyclical components of money reflect incremental ban," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(1), pages 69-108, January.
  2. Eddie Gerba & Klemens Hauzenberger, 2013. "Estimating US Fiscal and Monetary Interactions in a Time Varying VAR," Studies in Economics 1303, Department of Economics, University of Kent.

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