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Money, Prices and Liquidity Effects: Separating Demand from Supply

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  • Chadha, J.S.
  • Corrado, L.
  • Sun, Q.

Abstract

In the canonical monetary policy model, money is endogenous to the optimal path for interest rates and output. But when liquidity provision by banks dominates the demand for transactions money from the real economy, money is likely to contain information for future output and inflation because of its impact on financial spreads. And so we decompose broad money into primitive demand and supply shocks. We find that supply shocks have dominated the time series in both the UK and the US in the short to medium term. We further consider to what extent the supply of broad money is related to policy or to liquidity effects from financial intermediation.

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Paper provided by Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge in its series Cambridge Working Papers in Economics with number 0855.

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Date of creation: Nov 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0855

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Keywords: Money; Prices; Bayesian VAR Identi.cation; Sign Restrictions.;

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References

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  1. Jon Faust, 1998. "The robustness of identified VAR conclusions about money," International Finance Discussion Papers 610, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1996. "Nobel Lecture: Monetary Neutrality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 661-82, August.
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  7. Faust, Jon, 1998. "The robustness of identified VAR conclusions about money," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 207-244, December.
  8. Ben S. Bernanke & Ilian Mihov, 1998. "The Liquidity Effect and Long-Run Neutrality," NBER Working Papers 6608, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Dedola, Luca & Neri, Stefano, 2006. "What does a technology shock do? A VAR analysis with model-based sign restrictions," Working Paper Series 0705, European Central Bank.
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  12. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1982. "Interest rates and currency prices in a two-country world," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 335-359.
  13. Chadha, J.S. & Corrado, L. & Holly, S., 2008. "Reconnecting Money to Inflation: The Role of the External Finance Premium," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0852, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  14. Pamela Labadie, 1991. "The term structure of interest rates over the business cycle," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 159, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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  17. William D. Lastrapes & W. Douglas McMillin, 2004. "Cross-Country Variation in the Liquidity Effect: The Role of Financial Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(498), pages 890-915, October.
  18. Fabio Canova & Gianni De Nicolo, 2000. "Monetary disturbances matter for business fluctuations in the G-7," International Finance Discussion Papers 660, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  19. Carlstrom, Charles T. & Fuerst, Timothy S., 1995. "Interest rate rules vs. money growth rules a welfare comparison in a cash-in-advance economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 247-267, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Jagjit S. Chadha & Luisa Corrado & Sean Holly, 2008. "Reconnecting Money to Inflation: The Role of the External Finance Premium," Studies in Economics 0816, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  2. Jagjit S. Chadha & Luisa Corrado & Sean Holly, 2013. "A Note on Money and the Conduct of Monetary Policy," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1329, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  3. Deryugina, Elena B. & Ponomarenko, Alexey A., 2011. "Identifying structural shocks behind loan supply fluctuations in Russia," BOFIT Discussion Papers 20/2011, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  4. Villa, Stefania & Yang, Jing, 2011. "Financial intermediaries in an estimated DSGE model for the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 431, Bank of England.
  5. Jagjit S. Chadha, 2012. "World Real Interest Rates: A Tale of Two Regimes," Studies in Economics 1205, Department of Economics, University of Kent.

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