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Changes in the source of China's regional inequality

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  • Lee, Jongchul
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 232-245

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:11:y:2000:i:3:p:232-245

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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    Cited by:
    1. Heshmati, Almas, 2004. "Regional Income Inequality in Selected Large Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 1307, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Xiaolei Qian & Russell Smyth, 2005. "Growth Accounting for the Chinese Provinces 1990-2000: Incorporating Human Capital Accumulation," Monash Economics Working Papers 11/05, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    3. Catin, Maurice & Luo, Xubei & Van Huffel, Christophe, 2005. "Openness, industrialization, and geographic concentration of activities in China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3706, The World Bank.
    4. Shiu, Alice & Heshmati, Almas, 2006. "Technical Change and Total Factor Productivity Growth for Chinese Provinces: A Panel Data Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 2133, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Xubei Luo & Nong Zhu & Heng-fu Zou, 2012. "China's lagging region development and targeted transportation infrastructure investments," CEMA Working Papers 536, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    6. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Nielsen, Ingrid & Smyth, Russell, 2008. "Panel data, cointegration, causality and Wagner's law: Empirical evidence from Chinese provinces," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 297-307, June.
    7. Du, Yuxin & Teixeira, Aurora A.C., 2012. "A bibliometric account of Chinese economics research through the lens of the China Economic Review," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 743-762.
    8. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & James Hughes & Dandan Zhang, 2005. "Economic Reform and Changing Patterns of Labor Force Participation in Urban and Rural China," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp787, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    9. Margaret Maurer-Fazio, & James W. Hughes & Dandan Zhang, 2005. "A Comparison of Reform-Era Labor Force Participation Rates of China’s Ethnic Minorities and Han Majority," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp795, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    10. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & James Hughes, 2002. "The Effects of Market Liberalization on the Relative Earnings of Chinese Women," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 460, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    11. Xiaolei Qian & Russell Smyth, 2008. "Measuring regional inequality of education in China: widening coast-inland gap or widening rural-urban gap?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 132-144.
    12. Reuter & Ulrich, 2004. "The Effects of Intraregional Disparities on Regional Development in China: Inequality Decomposition and Panel-Data Analysis," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 716, Econometric Society.
    13. Jr-Tsung Huang & Chun-Chien Kuo & An-Pang Kao, 2003. "The Inequality of Regional Economic Development in China between 1991 and 2001," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(3), pages 273-285.
    14. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Shi, Li, 2002. "Income inequality within and across counties in rural China 1988 and 1995," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 179-204, October.
    15. James Alm & Yongzheng Liu, 2013. "China's Tax-for-Fee Reform and Village Inequality," Working Papers 1304, Tulane University, Department of Economics.

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