Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Rethinking Inequality Decomposition, with Evidence from Rural China

Contents:

Author Info

  • Jonathan Morduch
  • Terry Sicular

Abstract

We introduce a new, integrated regression-based approach for decomposing inequality indices with household-level data, and we examine the strengths and weaknesses of inequality decompositions by income source in light of the way that they are commonly interpreted. The approach uses estimated income flows from variables in linear income equations to decompose aggregate inequality indices. The integrated approach provides an efficient and flexible way to quantify the roles of variables like education, age, infrastructure, and social status in a multivariate context. These tools are applied to a new data set with rich information on incomes in Zouping County in Shandong Province, China. The evidence from China illustrates the sharp differences that can result when using decomposition methods with varying properties, and it demonstrates advantages of the proposed, integrated method. We trace the differences to how the decomposition methodologies treat equally-distributed sources of income. The empirical results show the importance that spatial segmentations play in increasing inequality: village of residence strongly drives inequality in the sample. This force is counter-balanced in part by the relatively equitable distribution of human capital, especially demographic variables. Contrary to other recent findings, affiliation with the Communist Party and measures of social status have a very limited role in explaining inequality.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Harvard - Institute of Economic Research in its series Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers with number 1831.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:harver:1831

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 200 Littauer Center, Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-2144
Fax: 617-495-7730
Web page: http://www.economics.harvard.edu/journals/hier
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Knight, J. & Shi, L., 1996. "Cumulative Causation and Inequality Among Villages in China," Economics Series Working Papers 99186, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Benjamin, Dwayne & Brandt, Loren, 1997. "Land, Factor Markets, and Inequality in Rural China: Historical Evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 460-494, October.
  3. Jonathan Morduch & Terry Sicular, 2002. "Rethinking Inequality Decomposition, With Evidence from Rural China," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(476), pages 93-106, January.
  4. Fei, John C H & Rainis, Gustav & Kuo, Shirley W Y, 1978. "Growth and the Family Distribution of Income by Factor Components," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 92(1), pages 17-53, February.
  5. Shorrocks, Anthony F, 1983. "The Impact of Income Components on the Distribution of Family Incomes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 98(2), pages 311-26, May.
  6. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 1998. "Geographic Poverty Traps?," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development 86, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  7. Morduch, Jonathan & Sicular, Terry, 2000. "Politics, growth, and inequality in rural China: does it pay to join the Party?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 331-356, September.
  8. Lerman, Robert I & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1985. "Income Inequality Effects by Income," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 151-56, February.
  9. Shorrocks, A F, 1982. "Inequality Decomposition by Factor Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 193-211, January.
  10. Sheldon Danziger, 1980. "Do Working Wives Increase Family Income Inequality?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 15(3), pages 444-451.
  11. James E. Foster & Efe A. Ok, 1999. "Lorenz Dominance and the Variance of Logarithms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(4), pages 901-908, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
This item has more than 25 citations. To prevent cluttering this page, these citations are listed on a separate page.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:harver:1831. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.