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Measuring regional inequality of education in China: widening coast-inland gap or widening rural-urban gap?

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Author Info

  • Xiaolei Qian

    (Department of Economics, Monash University, Australia)

  • Russell Smyth

    (Department of Economics, Monash University, Australia)

Abstract

This article measures education inequality between the coastal and inland provinces and compares it with rural-urban educational inequality in China, using Gini education coefficients and decomposition analysis. The main finding of the article is that disparities in access to education between rural and urban areas rather than between coastal and inland provinces are the major cause of educational inequality in China. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1396
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 20 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 132-144

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:20:y:2008:i:2:p:132-144

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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References

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  1. Jones, Derek C. & Li, Cheng & Owen, Ann L., 2003. "Growth and regional inequality in China during the reform era," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 186-200.
  2. Jensen, P. & Nielsen, H.S., 1996. "Child Labour or School Attendance? Evidence from Zambia," Papers 96-14, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research, Danmark-.
  3. Chen, Baizhu & Feng, Yi, 2000. "Determinants of economic growth in China: Private enterprise, education, and openness," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 1-15.
  4. Tsang, Mun C., 1996. "Financial reform of basic education in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 423-444, October.
  5. Lee, Jongchul, 2000. "Changes in the source of China's regional inequality," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 232-245.
  6. Park, Kang H., 1996. "Educational expansion and educational inequality on income distribution," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 51-58, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Salwa TRABELSI, 2013. "Regional Inequality Of Education In Tunisia: An Evaluation By The Gini Index," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 37, pages 95-117.
  2. Kate Glazebrook & Ligang Song, 2013. "Is China up to the Test? A Review of Theories and Priorities for Education Investment for a Modern China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 21(4), pages 56-78, 07.

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