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Do Public Ph.D.-Granting Economics Departments Invert Salaries?

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  • Christiana Hilmer

    ()
    (San Diego State University)

  • Michael Hilmer

    ()
    (San Diego State University)

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    Abstract

    This study analyzes a unique data set containing current salary and detailed job history information on a sample of 902 individuals drawn from 43 public U.S. Ph.D.-granting departments of economics. An analysis of current salaries by academic rank shows that 25% of Assistant Professors earn more that 50% of Associate Professors and 25% of Associate Professors earn more than 25% of Full Professors. Regression analysis suggests that salary inversion is most likely to exist between Associate and Assistant Professors and is more prevalent in lower ranked programs.

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2010/Volume30/EB-10-V30-I2-P85.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 924-932

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    Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00628

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    Related research

    Keywords: Salary Inversion;

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    1. Bernt Bratsberg & James F. Ragan & Jr & John T. Warren, 2003. "Negative returns to seniority: New evidence in academic markets," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(2), pages 306-323, January.
    2. Ransom, Michael R, 1993. "Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 221-33, March.
    3. Scott, Loren C & Mitias, Peter M, 1996. "Trends in Rankings of Economics Departments in the U.S.: An Update," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(2), pages 378-400, April.
    4. Stock, Wendy A & Siegfried, John J, 2001. "So You Want to Earn a Ph.D. in Economics: How Much Do You Think You'll Make?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(2), pages 320-35, April.
    5. Moore, William J & Newman, Robert J & Turnbull, Geoffrey K, 1998. "Do Academic Salaries Decline with Seniority?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 352-66, April.
    6. Wendy A. Stock & John J. Siegfried, 2006. "Where are they Now? Tracking the Ph.D. Class of 1997," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0605, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
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