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So You Want to Earn a Ph.D. in Economics: How Much Do You Think You'll Make?

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  • Stock, Wendy A
  • Siegfried, John J

Abstract

Using data from individuals who earned a Ph.D. in economics in 1996-97, this study identifies factors associated with securing full-time permanent positions and determinants of starting salaries for new Ph.D. economists. Where individuals attend graduate school and factors including the field of specialization and work as a teaching/research assistant impact whether graduates obtain full-time permanent jobs. Choice of graduate program and amount of time spent in the program influence starting salary, as does obtaining a position outside academia or in a research-oriented academic institution, both of which entail higher salaries relative to employment at a B.A.-level academic institution. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 39 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 320-35

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:39:y:2001:i:2:p:320-35

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Cited by:
  1. Wendy A. Stock & John J. Siegfried, 2006. "Where Are They Now? Tracking the Ph.D. Class of 1997," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 472–488, October.
  2. Christiana Hilmer & Michael Hilmer, 2010. "Do Public Ph.D.-Granting Economics Departments Invert Salaries?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(2), pages 924-932.
  3. John J. Siegfried & Wendy A. Stock, 2006. "The Undergraduate Origins of Ph.D. Economists," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0611, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  4. Chen, Jihui Susan & Liu, Qihong & Billger, Sherrilyn M., 2012. "Where Do New Ph.D. Economists Go? Evidence from Recent Initial Job Placements," IZA Discussion Papers 6990, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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