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Attrition in Models of Intergenerational Links Using the PSID with Extensions to Health and to Sibling Models

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  • Fitzgerald John M

    ()
    (Bowdoin College)

Abstract

Selective attrition potentially biases estimation of intergenerational links in health and economic status. This paper documents attrition in the PSID through 2007 for a cohort of children, and investigates attrition bias in intergenerational models predicting adult health, education and earnings, including models based on sibling differences. Although attrition affects unconditional means, the weighted PSID generally maintains its representativeness along key dimensions in comparison to the National Health Interview Survey. Using PSID, sibling correlations in outcomes and father-son correlations in earnings are not significantly affected by attrition. Models of intergenerational links with covariates yield more mixed results with females showing few robust impacts of attrition and males showing potential attrition bias for education and earnings outcomes. For adult health outcomes conditional on child background, neither gender shows significant impacts of attrition for the age ranges and models considered here. Sibling models do not produce robustly higher attrition impacts than individual models.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy.

Volume (Year): 11 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 1-63

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:11:y:2011:i:3:n:2

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Cited by:
  1. Bettina Lamla, 2013. "Family background and the decision to provide for old age: a siblings approach," Empirica, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 483-504, August.
  2. Lamla, Bettina, 2012. "Family background, informal networks and the decision to provide for old age: A siblings approach," MEA discussion paper series 12261, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  3. Islam, TM Tonmoy, 2013. "Childhood neighborhood conditions and the persistence of adult income," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 684-693.
  4. Gouskova, Elena, 2014. "Parameter estimates comparison of earnings functions in the PSID and CPS data, 1976–2007," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 353-357.
  5. Bettina Lamla, 2012. "Family Background, Informal Networks and the Decision to Provide for Old Age: A Siblings Approach," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 466, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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