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Robust estimation with discrete explanatory variables


  • Čížek, Pavel


The least squares estimator is probably the most frequently used estimation method in regression analysis. Unfortunately, it is also quite sensitive to data contamination and model misspecification. Although there are several robust estimators designed for parametric regression models that can be used in place of least squares, these robust estimators cannot be easily applied to models containing binary and categorical explanatory variables. Therefore, I design a robust estimator that can be used for any linear regression model no matter what kind of explanatory variables the model contains. Additionally, I propose an adaptive procedure that maximizes the efficiency of the proposed estimator for a given data set while preserving its robustness.
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Suggested Citation

  • Čížek, Pavel, 2002. "Robust estimation with discrete explanatory variables," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 2002,76, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:sfb373:200276

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Zaman, Asad & Rousseeuw, Peter J. & Orhan, Mehmet, 2001. "Econometric applications of high-breakdown robust regression techniques," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 1-8, April.
    2. White, Halbert, 1980. "Nonlinear Regression on Cross-Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(3), pages 721-746, April.
    3. Franco Peracchi, 1988. "Robust M-Estimators," UCLA Economics Working Papers 477, UCLA Department of Economics.
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    JEL classification:

    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis


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