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The next SSM term: Supervisory challenges ahead

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  • Götz, Martin
  • Tröger, Tobias
  • Wahrenburg, Mark

Abstract

In this note, we first highlight different developments for banks under direct ECB supervision within the SSM that may prompt further investigation by supervisors. We find that banks that were weakly capitalized at the start of direct ECB supervision (1) still face elevated levels of non-performing loans, (2) are less cost-efficient and (3) reduced their share of subordinated debt financing over the last years. We then stress the importance of continuous and ongoing cost-benefit analysis regarding banking supervision in Europe. We also encourage processes to question existing supervisory practices to ensure a lean and efficient banking supervision. Finally, we underline the need of continuous and intensified coordination among regulatory bodies in the Banking Union since the efficacy of European bank supervision rests on its interplay with many different institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Götz, Martin & Tröger, Tobias & Wahrenburg, Mark, 2019. "The next SSM term: Supervisory challenges ahead," SAFE White Paper Series 59, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:safewh:59
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Götz, Martin & Krahnen, Jan Pieter & Tröger, Tobias, 2017. "Five years after the Liikanen Report: What have we learned?," SAFE White Paper Series 50, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
    2. Barth, James R. & Caprio, Gerard Jr. & Levine, Ross, 2012. "Guardians of Finance: Making Regulators Work for Us," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262017393, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Keywords

    SSM; Banking Union; ECB supervision;
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