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Macroeconomic Effects of Productivity Shocks – A VAR Model of a Small Open Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Vladimir Arčabić

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb)

  • Tomislav Globan

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb)

  • Ozana Nadoveza

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb)

  • Lucija Rogić Dumančić

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb)

  • Josip Tica

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb)

Abstract

The paper compares theoretical impulse response functions from a DSGE model for a small open economy with an empirical five variable VAR model estimated for the Croatian economy. In the paper we analyse the impact of productivity shock on the selected macroeconomic variables: domestic output gap, nominal interest rate, CPI inflation and terms of trade. The impulse responses from the empirical VAR model do not resemble those from the theoretical one for all the variables in any proposed monetary regimes. Results of modelling simultaneous interrelationships between variables also support the results that the productivity shocks do not play a significant role in determining the variation of selected macroeconomic variables in the case of the Croatian economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Vladimir Arčabić & Tomislav Globan & Ozana Nadoveza & Lucija Rogić Dumančić & Josip Tica, 2016. "Macroeconomic Effects of Productivity Shocks – A VAR Model of a Small Open Economy," EFZG Working Papers Series 1606, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb.
  • Handle: RePEc:zag:wpaper:1606
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hodrick, Robert J & Prescott, Edward C, 1997. "Postwar U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16, February.
    2. Jordi Galí & Tommaso Monacelli, 2005. "Monetary Policy and Exchange Rate Volatility in a Small Open Economy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(3), pages 707-734.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Milan Deskar-Škrbić, 2018. "Dynamic effects of fiscal policy in Croatia: confronting New-Keynesian SOE theory with empirics," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 36(1), pages 83-102.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE; productivity shocks; small open economy; exchange rate; Croatia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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