IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Multivariate analysis of trip-chaining behavior


  • John V. Thomas


  • Robert Noland



Trip-chaining behavior has generally been associated with various demographic characteristics of households and individuals. This includes households with children having more complex activity patterns, or those who are employed needing to conduct activities on the way to and from work because of time constraints. No studies, as yet, have controlled for other factors that might influence trip chaining behaviour, such as levels of urbanization, public transport availability, use of other transport modes, or various other local environmental factors. This paper explores these issues using both the 1995 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey and the 2001 National Household Travel Survey. Both surveys have data on trip chaining behavior that allows multivariate analysis of individual level behavior. Various choice models are estimated, including ordered models that account for the number of chains in a trip. Results for both the 1995 and 2001 surveys are presented to examine potential changes in behavior over time.

Suggested Citation

  • John V. Thomas & Robert Noland, 2005. "Multivariate analysis of trip-chaining behavior," ERSA conference papers ersa05p541, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p541

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Salomon, Ilan, 2001. "How derived is the demand for travel? Some conceptual and measurement considerations," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 695-719, September.
    2. Rosenbloom, Sandra & Burns, Elizabeth, 1993. "Gender Differences in Commuter Travel in Tucson: Implications for Travel Demand management Programs," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt036776w2, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Gärling, Tommy & Gärling, Anita & Johansson, Anders, 2000. "Household choices of car-use reduction measures," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 309-320, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Veronique Acker & Frank Witlox, 2011. "Commuting trips within tours: how is commuting related to land use?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 465-486, May.
    2. Manoj, M. & Verma, Ashish, 2015. "Activity–travel behaviour of non-workers from Bangalore City in India," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 400-424.
    3. Jan-Dirk Schmöcker & Fengming Su & Robert Noland, 2010. "An analysis of trip chaining among older London residents," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 105-123, January.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p541. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gunther Maier). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.