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Rethinking the form and function of cities in post-Soviet countries

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  • Coulibaly, Souleymane

Abstract

Eurasian cities, unique in the global spatial landscape, were part of the world's largest experiment in urban development. The challenges they now face because of their history offer valuable lessons to urban planners and policymakers across the world from places that are still urbanizing to those already urbanized. Today, Eurasian cities must respond to three big changes: the breakup of the Soviet Union, the return of the market as the driving force of society, and the emergence of regional powers such as the European Union, China, and India that are competing with the Russian Federation for markets and influence in its former satellites. Several methods of analysis indicate an imbalance across Eurasia, implying a need to readjust Eurasia's urban structure. National policies in Eurasia are still preoccupied with spatial equity. But the concentration of economic activity in large cities is fundamental to national competitive advantage: they foster innovation through their diversity of industries -- and reduce production costs through their economies of scale. This paper suggests some ideas on how policymakers can harness the economic power of cities to drive national economic development, by focusing on four themes: planning, connecting, greening, and financing cities.

Suggested Citation

  • Coulibaly, Souleymane, 2012. "Rethinking the form and function of cities in post-Soviet countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6292, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6292
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp & Iulia Traistaru, 2003. "Determinants of Manufacturing Location in EU Accession Countries," ERSA conference papers ersa03p310, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Mikhailova, Tatiana, 2012. "Where russians should live: a counterfactual alternative to Soviet location policy," MPRA Paper 35938, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Ali Mansoor & Bryce Quillin, 2007. "Migration and Remittances : Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6920, April.
    4. Masahisa Fujita & Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 2001. "The Spatial Economy: Cities, Regions, and International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262561476, January.
    5. Indermit Gill & Homi Kharas, 2007. "An East Asian Renaissance : Ideas for Economic Growth," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6798, April.
    6. Hanson, Gordon H., 1996. "Economic integration, intraindustry trade, and frontier regions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 941-949, April.
    7. Thomas Farole & Gokhan Akinci, 2011. "Special Economic Zones : Progress, Emerging Challenges, and Future Directions," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2341, April.
    8. Souleymane Coulibaly & Uwe Deichmann & William R. Dillinger & Marcel Ionescu Heroiu & Ioannis N. Kessides & Charles Kunaka & Daniel Saslavsky, 2012. "Eurasian Cities : New Realities along the Silk Road," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11877, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gary A. Dymski, 2013. "The Crisis of the Core Seen through the Eyes of the Periphery: A Schelling Model of the Global-South Megacity and the European Crisis," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(4), pages 433-455, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Environmental Economics&Policies; City Development Strategies; Banks&Banking Reform; Housing&Human Habitats;

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