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Infrastructure and economic growth in the Middle East and North Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Um, Paul Noumba
  • Straub, Stephane
  • Vellutini, Charles

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of infrastructure on growth of total factor productivity and per capita income, using both growth accounting techniques and cross-country growth regressions. The two econometric techniques yield some consistent and some different results. Regressions based in the growth accounting framework suggest that electricity production helps explain cross-country differences in total factor productivity growth in the Middle East and North Africa region. Growth regressions support that conclusion, while also stressing an effect of telecommunications infrastructure. Finally, growth regressions also indicate quite consistently that the returns to infrastructure have been lower in the Middle East and North Africa region than in developing countries as a whole.

Suggested Citation

  • Um, Paul Noumba & Straub, Stephane & Vellutini, Charles, 2009. "Infrastructure and economic growth in the Middle East and North Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5105, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5105
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Younis, Fizza, 2014. "Significance of Infrastructure Investment for Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 72659, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Jun 2015.
    2. Wang, Miao & Wong, M. C. Sunny, 2012. "International R&D Transfer and Technical Efficiency: Evidence from Panel Study Using Stochastic Frontier Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(10), pages 1982-1998.
    3. Shi, Yingying & Guo, Shen & Sun, Puyang, 2017. "The role of infrastructure in China’s regional economic growth," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 26-41.
    4. Víctor Adame & Javier Alonso & Luisa Pérez & David Tuesta, 2017. "Infrastructure & economic growth from a meta-analysis approach: do all roads lead to Rome?," Working Papers 17/07, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
    5. Coutinho, Leonor, 2012. "Determinants of Growth and Inflation in Southern Mediterranean Countries," CEPS Papers 6736, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    6. Remi Jedwab & Adam Storeygard, "undated". "Economic and Political Factors in Infrastructure Investment: Evidence from Railroads and Roads in Africa 1960–2015," Working Papers 2017-3, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Achieving Shared Growth; Economic Growth; E-Business; Energy Production and Transportation;

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