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Safeguards and antidumping in Latin American trade liberalization

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  • Finger, J. Michael
  • Nogues, Julio J.

Abstract

The binding of tariff rates and adoption of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade/World Trade Organization-sanctioned safeguards and antidumping mechanisms provided the basis to remove a multitude of instruments of protection in the Latin American countries discussed in this paper. At the same time, they helped in maintaining centralized control over the management of pressures for protection in agencies with economy-wide accountabilities. The World Trade Organization's procedural requirements (for example, to follow published criteria, or participation by interested parties) helped leaders to change the culture of decision-making from one based on relationships to one based on objective criteria. However, when Latin American governments attempted to introduce economic sense - such as base price comparisons on an economically sensible measure of long-run international price rather than the more generous constructed cost concept that is the core of WTO rules - protection-seekers used the rules against them. They pointed out that World Trade Organization rules do not require the use of such criteria, nor do procedures in leading users (industrial countries) include such criteria. In sum, the administrative content of the rules supported liberalization; the economic content did not.

Suggested Citation

  • Finger, J. Michael & Nogues, Julio J., 2008. "Safeguards and antidumping in Latin American trade liberalization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4680, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4680
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael O. Moore & Maurizio Zanardi, 2009. "Does antidumping use contribute to trade liberalization in developing countries?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(2), pages 469-495, May.
    2. Bown, Chad P., 2006. "The World Trade Organization and antidumping in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4014, The World Bank.
    3. Peter Egger & Douglas Nelson, 2011. "How Bad Is Antidumping? Evidence from Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1374-1390, November.
    4. Chad P. Bown & Rachel McCulloch, 2012. "Antidumping and Market Competition: Implications for Emerging Economies," Working Papers 50, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    5. Feinberg Robert M., 2011. "Antidumping as a Development Issue," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 11(3), pages 1-17, September.
    6. Bown, Chad P., 2005. "Global antidumping database version 1.0," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3737, The World Bank.
    7. Chad P. Bown, 2011. "Taking Stock of Antidumping, Safeguards and Countervailing Duties, 1990–2009," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(12), pages 1955-1998, December.
    8. Jørgen Hansen & Philipp Meinen & Jørgen Nielsen, 2014. "Elasticity of substitution and anti-dumping decisions," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(4), pages 787-816, November.
    9. Tobias D. Ketterer, 2015. "Antidumping Use and Its Effect on Trade Liberalization. Evidence for the European Union," Discussion Papers 2015-11, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    10. Henry Gao, 2011. "Trans-Pacific strategic economic partnership agreement: High standard or missed opportunity?," STUDIES IN TRADE AND INVESTMENT,in: Trade-led growth: A sound strategy for Asia, chapter 5 United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Theory&Research; Free Trade; Trade Law; Emerging Markets; Trade Policy;

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