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Aggregate Consumption Behavior and Liquidity Constraints: The Canadian Evidence

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  • Wirjanto, T.S.

Abstract

This paper considers a general permanent-income model in which a fraction of consumers in the economy is liquidity constrained. Consumption growth rate for these individuals is related to the growth rate of their income and the level of real interest rates. The interest-rate coefficient is predicted to be smaller in the presence of liquidity constraints. Empirically, liquidity constraints are found to be important, and the estimated intertemporal elasticity of substitution parameter is much larger than the one obtained by estimating the standard representative agent model. Lastly, there is some evidence of structural changes over the sample period, which are associated with the 1982 recession.
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Suggested Citation

  • Wirjanto, T.S., 1993. "Aggregate Consumption Behavior and Liquidity Constraints: The Canadian Evidence," Working Papers 9315, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wat:wpaper:9315
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    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Havranek & Anna Sokolova, 2016. "Do Consumers Really Follow a Rule of Thumb? Three Thousand Estimates from 130 Studies Say “Probably Not”," Working Papers IES 2016/15, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jul 2016.
    2. Henry, O. & Messinis, G. & Olekalns, N., 1999. "Rational Habit Modification: the Role of Credit," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 729, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Havranek, Tomas & Horvath, Roman & Irsova, Zuzana & Rusnak, Marek, 2015. "Cross-country heterogeneity in intertemporal substitution," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 100-118.
    4. Sydney Ludvigson & Christina H. Paxson, 2001. "Approximation Bias In Linearized Euler Equations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 242-256, May.
    5. Luis Zambrano Sequín & Matías Riutort & Rafael Muñoz & Juan Carlos Guevara, 1998. "El ahorro privado en Venezuela: Tendencias y determinantes," Research Department Publications 3021, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    6. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & Tony S. Wirjanto, 2010. "Testing the Stochastic Implications of the Permanent Income Hypothesis Using Canadian Provincial Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 89-108, February.
    7. Bérubé, Gilles & Côté, Denise, 2000. "Long-Term Determinants of the Personal Savings Rate: Literature Review and Some Empirical Results for Canada," Staff Working Papers 00-3, Bank of Canada.
    8. Sarantis, Nicholas & Stewart, Chris, 2003. "Liquidity constraints, precautionary saving and aggregate consumption: an international comparison," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 1151-1173, December.
    9. Jin Xu & Dongmin Kong, 2015. "Understanding The Household Consumption Behavior In Urban China," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 60(05), pages 1-21, December.
    10. Bacchetta, Philippe & Gerlach, Stefan, 1997. "Consumption and credit constraints: International evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 207-238, October.

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    Keywords

    demand ; money ; money supply ; consumption;

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