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Who do heterodox economists think they are?

  • Andrew Mearman

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of the West of England, UK)

This paper attempts to engage with the established debate on the nature of heterodox economics. However, it starts from the position that previous attempts to classify and identify heterodox economics have been biased towards a priori definition. The paper aims to inform the discussion of the nature of heterodoxy with some empirical analysis. The paper examines survey data collected from a small/medium-sized sample of AHE members on the core concepts in economics. The paper applies factor analysis to the data. It also applies principles of biological taxonomy, and thence cluster analysis to the problem. The paper finds that within the self-identified community of self-identified heterodox economists there is little agreement as to whether members are pluralist, or what their attitude is to the mainstream. Indeed, there is little agreement on any core concepts or principles. The paper argues that there is little structure to heterodox economics beyond that provided by pre-existing (or constituent) schools of thought. Based on this study, heterodox economics appears a complex web of interacting individuals and as a group is a fuzzy set. These results would lead us to question further strict distinctions between heterodox, mainstream and pluralist economists.

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File URL: http://carecon.org.uk/DPs/0915.pdf
File Function: First version, 2009
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol in its series Working Papers with number 0915.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:0915
Contact details of provider: Postal: 0117 328 3610
Phone: 0117 328 3610
Web page: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/research/bristoleconomics.aspx

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  1. Tony Lawson, 2006. "The nature of heterodox economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(4), pages 483-505, July.
  2. David Dequech, 2007. "Neoclassical, Mainstream, Orthodox, And Heterodox Economics," Anais do XXXV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 35th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 043, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  3. Andrew Mearman, 2008. "Rhetorical Dualism and the Orthodox/Heterdox Distinction in Economics," Working Papers 0802, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  4. J. E. King, 2002. "A History of Post Keynesian Economics since 1936," Books, Edward Elgar, number 2135, July.
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