IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

An Economic Model of the Evolution of the Gender Performance Ratio in Individual Sports

  • Dupuy Arnaud

    (ROA rm)

This paper shows that gender world record ratio in four disciplines, i.e. marathon, triplejump, pole vault and 800 meters, follows a S-shape over time. It is argued that thispattern is initiated by a sudden drop in the social barrier for women to participate inthese disciplines. This drop in social barrier materializes -later- by the authorization forwomen to participate at major events, such as the Olympic Games, in these disciplines.The paper builds a simple economic model of sector self-selection and human capitalaccumulation with intrinsic disutility (social barriers) to participate in some sectors.As social barriers are removed in a sector, the Gender Performance Ratio is show tofollow a S-shape over time under very basic assumptions and calibrations. Ability selfselection,measured as the difference between mean ability of women in that sector andpopulation mean, becomes more positive after removal of the social barrier.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://digitalarchive.maastrichtuniversity.nl/fedora/objects/guid:12d02bb0-7a06-4256-9d33-bd9c979c797d/datastreams/ASSET1/content
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 401 Unauthorized. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Charles Bollen)


Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA) in its series ROA Research Memorandum with number 006.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2010006
Contact details of provider: Postal: P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht
Phone: 043-3883647
Fax: 043-3210999
Web page: http://www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Lalith Munasinghe & Brendan O'Flaherty & Stephan Danninger, 2001. "Globalization and the Rate of Technological Progress: What Track and Field Records Show," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(5), pages 1132-1149, October.
  2. Casey B. Mulligan & Yona Rubinstein, 2008. "Selection, Investment, and Women's Relative Wages Over Time," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 123(3), pages 1061-1110, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2010006. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Charles Bollen)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.