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Salience as an emergent property

Author

Listed:
  • Federica Alberti

    (University of Kent)

  • Robert Sugden

    (School of Economics and CBESS, University of East Anglia)

  • Kei Tsutsui

    (School of Economics and CBESS, University of East Anglia)

Abstract

We offer an evolutionary model of the emergence of concepts of salience through similarity-based learning. When an individual faces a new decision problem, she chooses an action that she perceives as similar to actions that, when chosen in similar previous problems, led to favourable outcomes. If some similarities are more reliably perceived than others, this process will favour the emergence of conventions that are defined in terms of reliably-perceived similarities. We present experimental evidence of such learning in recurrent play of similar but not identical pure coordination games.

Suggested Citation

  • Federica Alberti & Robert Sugden & Kei Tsutsui, 2011. "Salience as an emergent property," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 11-07, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
  • Handle: RePEc:uea:wcbess:11-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Vincent P. Crawford & Uri Gneezy & Yuval Rottenstreich, 2008. "The Power of Focal Points Is Limited: Even Minute Payoff Asymmetry May Yield Large Coordination Failures," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1443-1458, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Focal point; emergent property; similarity; coordination game;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior

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