IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uct/uconnp/2012-35.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Online Discussion and Learning Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • William T. Alpert

    (University of Connecticut)

  • Oskar R. Harmon

    (University of Connecticut)

  • Joseph Histen

    (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

In this paper we describe how we used online discussion forums to complement lecture presentations. We collected data on student usage and surveyed student opinion in several online/blended sections. Our hypothesis is that increased student participation in online discussion forums will increase learner engagement and learning outcomes. Using panel data we estimate a fixed effects model and find active participation in the discussion board has a positive effect on exam score at a statistically significant level. JEL Classification: A2, A22 Key words: Online Instruction, Social Media, Facebook

Suggested Citation

  • William T. Alpert & Oskar R. Harmon & Joseph Histen, 2012. "Online Discussion and Learning Outcomes," Working papers 2012-35, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2012-35
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://web2.uconn.edu/economics/working/2012-35.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Coates, Dennis & Humphreys, Brad R. & Kane, John & Vachris, Michelle A., 2004. ""No significant distance" between face-to-face and online instruction: evidence from principles of economics," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 533-546, October.
    2. Mary O. Borg & Stephen L. Shapiro, 1996. "Personality Type and Student Performance in Principles of Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 3-25, January.
    3. Yvonne Durham & Thomas Mckinnon & Craig Schulman, 2007. "Classroom Experiments: Not Just Fun And Games," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(1), pages 162-178, January.
    4. Daniel R. Marburger, 2006. "Does Mandatory Attendance Improve Student Performance?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 148-155, April.
    5. David Figlio & Mark Rush & Lu Yin, 2013. "Is It Live or Is It Internet? Experimental Estimates of the Effects of Online Instruction on Student Learning," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(4), pages 763-784.
    6. Paolo Pellizzari, 2012. "Facebook as an academic learning platform: A case study in Mathematics," Working Papers 2012_01, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    7. Chiara Gratton-Lavoie & Denise Stanley, 2009. "Teaching and Learning Principles of Microeconomics Online: An Empirical Assessment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 3-25, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2012-35. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark McConnel). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deuctus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.