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Foreign Direct Investment and Institutional Co-Evolution in Ireland

  • Frank Barry

    (University College of Dublin)

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    Ireland was one of the first countries in the world to adopt an FDI-oriented development strategy. It remains to this day the most FDI-intensive economy in Europe. These factors have helped configure the institutional structure of the economy to be able to respond rapidly to changes in the nature and requirements of the type of global FDI that an economy with Ireland’s advantages (and disadvantages) could reasonably hope to attract. This paper analyses the changing characteristics of European-bound FDI since the 1960s and the co-evolution of Irish development strategy.

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    File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/economics/research/papers/2006/WP06.03.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2006
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by School of Economics, University College Dublin in its series Working Papers with number 200603.

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    Length: 35 pages
    Date of creation: 08 Feb 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200603
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    Web page: http://www.ucd.ie/economics

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    1. K.H. Midelfart & H.G. Overman & S.J. Redding & A.J. Venables, 2000. "The location of European industry," European Economy - Economic Papers 142, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    2. Frank Barry & Holger Görg & Eric Strobl, 2003. "Foreign direct investment, agglomerations, and demonstration effects: An empirical investigation," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 139(4), pages 583-600, December.
    3. Gropp, Reint & Kostial, Kristina, 2000. "The disappearing tax base: is foreign direct investment eroding corporate income taxes?," Working Paper Series 0031, European Central Bank.
    4. Rosanne Altshuler & Harry Grubert & T. Scott Newlon, 2000. "Has U.S. Investment Abroad Become More Sensitive to Tax Rates?," NBER Chapters, in: International Taxation and Multinational Activity, pages 9-38 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Ferreira, Luisa & Vanhoudt, Patrick, 2002. "Catching The Celtic Tiger By Its Tail," Economic and Financial Reports 2002/1, European Investment Bank, Economics Department.
    6. Hines, J.R. & Rice, E.M., 1990. "Fiscal Paradise: Foreign Tax Havens And American Business," Papers 56, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Discussion Paper.
    7. de Mooij, Ruud A & Ederveen, Sjef, 2003. "Taxation and Foreign Direct Investment: A Synthesis of Empirical Research," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 10(6), pages 673-93, November.
    8. Patrick Gunnigle & David McGuire, 2001. "Why Ireland? A Qualitative Review of the Factors Influencing the Location of US Multinationals in Ireland with Particular Reference to the Impact of Labour Issues," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 43-67.
    9. Mihir A. Desai & C. Fritz Foley & James R. Hines Jr., 2002. "Chains of Ownership, Regional Tax Competition, and Foreign Direct Investment," NBER Working Papers 9224, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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