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Foreign direct investment and institutional co-evolution in Ireland

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  • Frank Barry

Abstract

Ireland was one of the first countries in the world to adopt an FDI-oriented development strategy. It remains to this day the most FDI-intensive economy in Europe. These factors have helped configure the institutional structure of the economy to be able to respond rapidly to changes in the nature and requirements of the type of global FDI that an economy with Ireland’s advantages (and disadvantages) could reasonably hope to attract. This paper analyses the changing characteristics of European-bound FDI since the 1960s and the co-evolution of Irish development strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Barry, 2006. "Foreign direct investment and institutional co-evolution in Ireland," Working Papers 200603, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200603
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/1269
    File Function: First version, 2006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frank Barry & Holger Görg & Eric Strobl, 2004. "Foreign direct investment, agglomerations, and demonstration effects: An empirical investigation," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 140(3), pages 583-600, September.
    2. Mihir A. Desai & C. Fritz Foley & James R. Hines Jr., 2002. "Chains of Ownership, Regional Tax Competition, and Foreign Direct Investment," NBER Working Papers 9224, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Gropp, Reint & Kostial, Kristina, 2000. "The disappearing tax base: is foreign direct investment eroding corporate income taxes?," Working Paper Series 0031, European Central Bank.
    4. de Mooij, Ruud A & Ederveen, Sjef, 2003. "Taxation and Foreign Direct Investment: A Synthesis of Empirical Research," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 10(6), pages 673-693, November.
    5. Rosanne Altshuler & Harry Grubert & T. Scott Newlon, 2000. "Has U.S. Investment Abroad Become More Sensitive to Tax Rates?," NBER Chapters,in: International Taxation and Multinational Activity, pages 9-38 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. O'Riain,Sean, 2004. "The Politics of High Tech Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521830737, May.
    7. James R. Hines & Eric M. Rice, 1994. "Fiscal Paradise: Foreign Tax Havens and American Business," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 149-182.
    8. Patrick Gunnigle & David McGuire, 2001. "Why Ireland? A Qualitative Review of the Factors Influencing the Location of US Multinationals in Ireland with Particular Reference to the Impact of Labour Issues," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 43-67.
    9. Ferreira, Luisa & Vanhoudt, Patrick, 2002. "Catching The Celtic Tiger By Its Tail," Economic and Financial Reports 2002/1, European Investment Bank, Economics Department.
    10. K.H. Midelfart & H.G. Overman & S.J. Redding & A.J. Venables, 2000. "The location of European industry," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 142, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
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    Cited by:

    1. Franck Barry, 2013. "The Knowledge Economy, Economic Transformations and ICT: Regional Dynamics in the Deployment Phase. Case study: Southern and Eastern Ireland," JRC Working Papers JRC83549, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

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