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Liquidity Effects With Long Lived Production Projects


  • Miquel Faig
  • Sonia Laszlo


This paper explores the effects of monetary shocks on the allocation of factors of production. We analyze these effects when money plays a role in improving the timing of the transactions undertaken by entrepreneurs. Such improvement is facilitated by money? important role in providing liquidity to entrepreneurs. Using a model in which production processes take time to mature and where credit contracts are not enforceable, we show the consequences of monetary shocks for the allocation of resources and the real business cycle. Our analysis reveals that such shocks disrupt the allocation of resources with important effects on total factor productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Miquel Faig & Sonia Laszlo, 2000. "Liquidity Effects With Long Lived Production Projects," Working Papers faig-00-02, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tor:tecipa:faig-00-02

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mark Gertler & Simon Gilchrist, 1994. "Monetary Policy, Business Cycles, and the Behavior of Small Manufacturing Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 309-340.
    2. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles, 1996. "The Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks: Evidence from the Flow of Funds," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 16-34, February.
    3. Fisher, Jonas D M, 1999. "Credit Market Imperfections and the Heterogeneous Response of Firms to Monetary Shocks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 187-211, May.
    4. Grossman, Sanford & Weiss, Laurence, 1983. "A Transactions-Based Model of the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(5), pages 871-880, December.
    5. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin, 1995. "Liquidity Effects, Monetary Policy, and the Business Cycle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1113-1136, November.
    6. Kwanghee Nam & Thomas F. Cooley, 1998. "Asymmetric information, financial intermediation, and business cycles," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 12(3), pages 599-620.
    7. Woodford, Michael, 1990. "Public Debt as Private Liquidity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 382-388, May.
    8. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1984. "A Monetary Equilibrium Model with Transactions Costs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(1), pages 40-58, February.
    9. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
    10. Lawrence J. Christiano, 1991. "Modeling the liquidity effect of a money shock," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 3-34.
    11. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1980. "Equilibrium in a Pure Currency Economy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 203-220, April.
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    More about this item


    Liquidity effects; long lived projects;

    JEL classification:

    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General

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