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Required Reserves as a Credit Policy Tool

Author

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  • Yasin Mimir
  • Enes Sunel
  • Temel Taskin

Abstract

This paper conducts a quantitative investigation of the role of reserve requirements as a macroprudential policy tool. We build a monetary DSGE model with a banking sector in which (i) an agency problem between households and banks leads to endogenous capital constraints for banks in obtaining funds from households, (ii) banks are subject to time-varying reserve requirements that countercyclically respond to expected credit growth, (iii) households face cash-in-advance constraints, requiring them to hold real balances, and (iv) standard productivity and money growth shocks are two sources of aggregate uncertainty. We calibrate the model to the Turkish economy which is representative of using reserve requirements as a macroprudential policy tool recently. We also consider the impact of financial shocks that affect the net worth of financial intermediaries. We find that (i) the time-varying required reserve ratio rule countervails the negative effects of the financial accelerator mechanism triggered by adverse macroeconomic and financial shocks, (ii) in response to TFP and money growth shocks, countercyclical reserves policy reduces the volatilities of key real macroeconomic and financial variables compared to fixed reserves policy over the business cycle, and (iii) a time-varying reserve requirement policy is welfare superior to a fixed reserve requirement policy. The credit policy is most effective when the economy is hit by a financial shock. Time-varying required reserves policy reduces the intertemporal distortions created by the credit spreads at expense of generating higher inflation volatility, indicating an interesting trade-off between price stability and financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Yasin Mimir & Enes Sunel & Temel Taskin, 2012. "Required Reserves as a Credit Policy Tool," Working Papers 1224, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcb:wpaper:1224
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    Cited by:

    1. Li Ma & Tsangyao Chang & Chien-Chiang Lee, 2016. "Reserve Requirement Policy, Bond Market, and Transmission Effect," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(2), pages 66-85, June.
    2. Cüneyt Akar & Serkan Çiçek, 2016. "“New” monetary policy instruments and exchange rate volatility," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 141-165, February.
    3. George J. Bratsiotis & William J. Tayler & Roy Zilberman, 2014. "Financial Regulation, Credit and Liquidity Policy and the Business Cycle," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 196, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    4. Pierre-Richard Agénor & K. Alper & L. Pereira da Silva, 2015. "External Shocks, Financial Volatility and Reserve Requirements in an Open Economy," Working Papers Series 396, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    5. Bin Wang & Tao Sun, 2013. "How Effective are Macroprudential Policies in China?," IMF Working Papers 13/75, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Matthew Greenwood-Nimmo & Artur Tarassow, 2013. "A Macroeconometric Assessment of Minsky’s Financial Instability Hypothesis," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 201306, Hamburg University, Department Wirtschaft und Politik.
    7. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Alper, Koray & Pereira da Silva, Luiz A., 2014. "Sudden floods, macroprudential regulation and stability in an open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(PA), pages 68-100.
    8. Yaprak Tavman, 2015. "A comparative analysis of macroprudential policies," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(2), pages 334-355.
    9. Ranat Eskinat, 2014. "New Monetary Policy Approach in Turkey Against Financial Systemic Risk," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 12(2), pages 201-214.
    10. Hakan Kara, 2016. "A brief assessment of Turkey's macroprudential policy approach : 2011–2015," Central Bank Review, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey, vol. 16(3), pages 85-92.
    11. Renzo Rossini & Adrián Armas & Zenón Quispe, 2014. "Global policy spillovers and Peru’s monetary policy: inflation targeting, foreign exchange intervention and reserve requirements," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The transmission of unconventional monetary policy to the emerging markets, volume 78, pages 241-264 Bank for International Settlements.
    12. George J. Bratsiotis, 2016. "Liquidity Regulation, Monetary Policy and Welfare," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 228, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    13. Marco Vega & Adrian Armas & Paul Castillo, 2014. "Inflation Targeting and Quantitative Tightening: Effects of Reserve Requirements in Peru," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2014), pages 133-175, June.
    14. Ryota Nakatani, 2016. "Twin Banking and Currency Crises and Monetary Policy," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 747-767, September.
    15. Juan Pablo Medina Guzman & Jorge Roldos, 2014. "Monetary and Macroprudential Policies to Manage Capital Flows," IMF Working Papers 14/30, International Monetary Fund.
    16. repec:eee:jbfina:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:110-128 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Bratsiotis, George J., 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits Channel," EconStor Preprints 172770, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    18. Yasin Mimir & Enes Sunel, 2015. "External shocks, banks and optimal monetary policy in an open economy," BIS Working Papers 528, Bank for International Settlements.
    19. George J. Bratsiotis, 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 236, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    20. Arif Oduncu & Yasin Akcelik & Ergun Ermisoglu, 2013. "Reserve Options Mechanism : A New Macroprudential Tool to Limit the Adverse Effects of Capital Flow Volatility on Exchange Rates," Central Bank Review, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey, vol. 13(3), pages 45-60.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banking sector; time-varying reserve requirements; macroeconomic and financial shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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