IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

What Australian investors need to know to diversity their portfolios

According to a report by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission in 2008, most (78%) of Australian investors had heard the term diversification. Nevertheless, around half of investors (49%) held only one type of investment (shares only) with the average number of holdings of 2.19 securities. More telling, a third (33%) of share owners acquired their shares passively (as part of a demutualisation or had received shares through an inheritance or gift), while almost two-thirds (63%) of share owners acquired the shares actively. One conclusion is that Australian investors, on average, own poorly diversified portfolios and leave themselves exposed to excessive diversifiable risk. To study this issue, we simulate portfolios using daily observations for all traded and delisted equities in Australia between 1975 and 2011. We calculate two measures of risk, including heavy tailed to account for extreme events. For each risk measure, we recommend the number of portfolio holdings that result in a 90% reduction in diversifiable risk for an average and a more conservative investor. We find that, on average, 24 to 30 stocks are sufficient to attain a well-diversified portfolio.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/17314/1/2013-17_Alexeev_and_Tapon_-_What_Australian_investors_need_to_know_to_diversify_their_portfolios.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2013-17.

as
in new window

Length: 10 pages
Date of creation: 20 Nov 2013
Date of revision: 20 Nov 2013
Publication status: Published by the University of Tasmania. Discussion paper series N 2013-17
Handle: RePEc:tas:wpaper:17314
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Private Bag 85, Hobart, Tasmania 7001

Phone: +61 3 6226 7672
Fax: +61 3 6226 7587
Web page: http://www.utas.edu.au/business-and-economics

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Ron Bird & Mark Tippett, 1986. "Note---Naive Diversification and Portfolio Risk---A Note," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 32(2), pages 244-251, February.
  2. John Y. Campbell, 2001. "Have Individual Stocks Become More Volatile? An Empirical Exploration of Idiosyncratic Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(1), pages 1-43, 02.
  3. Alexeev, Vitali & Tapon, Francis, 2013. "Equity Portfolio Diversification: How Many Stocks are Enough? Evidence from Five Developed Markets," Working Papers 2013-16, University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics, revised 20 Nov 2013.
  4. Simone Brands & David R. Gallagher, 2005. "Portfolio selection, diversification and fund-of-funds: a note," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 45(2), pages 185-197.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tas:wpaper:17314. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Vitali Alexeev)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.